Live score 28 June: Essex 1st: 106/0 (36) v Middlesex 1st: 246 (59.1)

Hall of fame

The most powerful influence on the game of cricket and a major force at Lord's for over 60 years as a high-class all-rounder, captain, selector and administrator, Sir George Oswald Browning "Gubby" Allen was born at Bellevue Hill, Sydney on 31st July 1902.

He represented Middlesex in 146 first-class matches from 1921 to 1950 and Cambridge University in 1922 and 1923. He took 420 wickets with a personal best of 10/40 versus Lancashire in 1929 at Lord's (8 clean bowled) versus Lancashire.

Representing his country in 25 Tests from 1930 to 1947/48, he toured abroad 3 times including the 1932/33 Ashes series when he refused to adopt 'bodyline' tactics. He scored 750 runs with a top score of 122 versus New Zealand at Lord's in 1931 and he took 81 wickets with a best of 7 for 80 versus India at the Oval in 1936. He was the second-oldest Test captain after W.G. Grace at 45 years 254 days when he led the M.C.C. tour to the West Indies in 1947/48.

He played 265 first-class matches scoring 9,233 runs and he took 788 wickets before retiring in 1950.

He served as Chairman of the Test Selectors and as President of M.C.C. (1963-1964) and Middlesex (1977-1979) , The former 'Q' Stand at Lord's was named after him. He was knighted for his services to cricket in 1986 and he died on 29th November 1989 aged 87.

Born at Acton, London in 1931, Dennis Baldry was a right-handed middle-order batsman and a useful off-break bowler. He played 49 first-class matches for the county accumulating 1155 runs at (14.62) with a top score of 61 and he took 11 wickets with a best performance of 4 for 60. After six seasons with Middlesex he moved to Hampshire for whom he played 85 matches between 1959 and 1962. He hit 151 for Hampshire on his debut versus Glamorgan at Portsmouth in 1959.

Graham Derek Barlow was born in Folkestone, Kent in 1950 and educated at Ealing Grammar School and Loughborough University. An exciting left-handed batsman and cover point fielder, who represented Ealing and Middlesex Schools. He scored 11,640 runs for the county in 239 first-class matches and took 132 catches. In limited-over cricket, he scored 5,800 runs in 244 matches, at an average of 27.88, with a highest score of 158. He formed a successful opening partnership with the late Wilf Slack. They set a long-held record stand of 367 for the 1st wicket. He played in three Tests for England. An all round sportsman, he also played rugby union for Rosslyn Park. Since his injury-enforced retirement, he has coached in England and South Africa.

Born at Friern Barnet, Middlesex on 11th February 1930, Philip Ian Bedford was a lower-order right-handed batsman and leg-break bowler. He made his Middlesex debut in 1947 when 17; he created a good impression by finishing second in the county bowling averages with 25 wickets (av. 19.36). He failed to maintain that early form and decided to leave county cricket. In 1961 Middlesex recalled him as captain and he led the county for two seasons. Playing 77 first-class matches he scored 979 runs (av. 16.31) with a top score of 75 n.o. bagged 128 wickets (av. 32.87) with a best performance of 6 for 52 and he held 46 catches. He toured abroad on three occasions to South America in 1958/59 and 1963/64 and North America in 1959. Sadly he collapsed whilst batting in a club match at Buckhurst Hill C.C., Essex on 18th September 1966 and died on his way to Wanstead Hospital.

Born at New Cross, Kent on 1st May 1868, George William Beldam was the brother of C.A. and cousin of E.A. Beldam, who also both represented Middlesex. A sound right-handed middle-order batsman and right-arm medium slow bowler he represented the county in 102 first-class between 1900 and 1907. Scoring 6,562 first-class runs (av. 30.23) with 9 centuries, his top score was 155 n.o. He bagged 107 wickets (av. 30.63) with a best performance of 5 for 28 and he held 83 catches. He scored 1,000 runs in a season on three occasions with a best of 1,158 (av.38.60) in 1901. The pioneer in action photography, he produced the plate photographs for the remarkable 'Great Batsmen, Their Methods at a Glance' book published in 1907. He also wrote books on golf and tennis. He died on 23rd November 1937 aged 69 at Lower Bourne, Surrey.

Born at Wakefield, Yorkshire on 18th December 1933, Donald Bennett had lived in Middlesex since 1940 and attended Ashford County Grammar School, so as to retain his residential qualification for the county.

A right-handed middle-order batsman and right-arm fast medium bowler he represented the county on 392 occasions between 1950 and 1968. He accumulated 10,274 runs (av. 21.85) with four centuries and a top score of 117 n.o. versus Yorkshire at Headingley in 1964 when he added 220 for the seventh wicket with J.T. Murray. He scored 1,000 runs in a season twice with a best of 1,144. As a strike bowler, he bagged 748 wickets (av. 26.45) with a best performance of 7 for 47 and he held 156 catches.

A noted soccer player he represented Arsenal and Coventry City. After retiring in 1968, he became an invaluable member of the Middlesex staff as county coach and was responsible for the 1st XI for 29 seasons until his retirement in 1997.

In retirement, he became Chairman of the Cricket Committee, a member of the General Committee and a founder member of the Executive Board. He served as President (2005-2007) and is also a life Vice President of the Club .

Gareth Berg was plucked from club cricket at Radlett Cricket Club to play for Middlesex CCC at the age of 27 by the then Director of Cricket, John Emburey. Berg, born in Cape Town, South Africa, on 18 January 1981 is a natural all-rounder. At times he would produce devastating displays with both ball and bat. As a batsman he gave the ball a good thump. With the ball he was a very skilful medium/fast swing bowler who bowled beautifully at left-handers.

Berg was capped in 2010 and in seven seasons with the club, in all forms of cricket, he scored more than 4,400 runs and took 207 wickets. His finest hour came when he struck consecutive deliveries for 6, 4 and 6 to win Middlesex the Division 2 title in 2011. Getting the club over the line gained him the affectionate nickname of ‘Iceman’ amongst Middlesex supporters. Berg was released by Middlesex CCC in 2014 because of injury concerns but he recovered from a shoulder problem and has subsequently performed well for Hampshire CCC.

Born at Hampstead, London in 1936, Don Bick was a useful right-handed batsman and right-arm off-spin bowler. He represented the county in 145 matches between 1954 and 1967 scoring 2,221 runs (av. 13.96) with a top score of 85, bagged 234 wickets (av. 27.70) with a best haul of 5 for 22 and he held 35 catches. After retiring from first-class cricket he represented Hertfordshire in the minor county championship.

Born at Bulls Cross, Enfield in 1877, Bernard James Tindal Bosanquet was a tall medium-pace right-arm leg-break bowler and a hard hitting batsman who invented the "googly". He represented Oxford University from 1898 to 1900 and Middlesex between 1989 and 1919 playing 123 first-class matches, he scored 11,696 runs with 21 centuries and he took 629 wickets. He achieved the coveted double in 1904 and became the first to complete a match double of a hundred in each innings and an aggregate of 10 wickets in the same match versus Sussex at Lord's in 1905. He hit 214 in 195 minutes while playing for the Rest of England versus Yorkshire at the Oval in 1908. Playing 7 Tests for England between 1903/04 and 1905 he took 25 wickets with a best performance of 8 for 107 versus Australia at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1905. He toured abroad 3 times and while at University he gained half-blues at billiards and hammer throwing and was also a fine ice-hockey player. Father of the late Reginald Bosanquet of television news fame, he died at Ewhurst, Surrey in 1936.

Born at Harrow in 1942, John Michael Brearley was an excellent tactical captain and an outstanding leader of players who made his first-class debut for Cambridge University in 1961. He later acted as captain in 1963 and 1964. He represented Middlesex from 1961 to 1983, (1971 to 1982 as captain), as an opening batsman and specialist slip fieldsman, leading the county to the championship 3 times and once shared. Playing 455 first-class matches he amassed 25,185 runs with 45 centuries and with a top score of 312 n.o. for M.C.C. Under 25 versus North Zone at Peshawar in 1966/67 and he held 418 catches. He represented England in 39 Tests, with 18 victories in 31 Tests as skipper, scoring 1,442 runs with a top score of 91 versus India at Bombay in 1976/77. He toured abroad 10 times and he was only the second captain after Len Hutton to regain and successfully defend the Ashes and he was the first to lead England to 5 wins in an Ashes series. Since retiring he has concentrated on psychotherapy, cricket writing and teaching.

Born at Eltham, Kent in 1917, Syd Brown was a forceful right-handed opening batsman, good deep fieldsman and occasional wicket keeper. He represented Middlesex 313 times between 1937 and 1955 and he made his debut for the county against Oxford University at the Parks in 1937 when his opening partner was fellow debutante E.W. Swanton. He amassed 15,050 runs (av. 29.51) with twenty centuries and achieved a top score of 232 n.o. versus Somerset at Lord's in 1951. He hit 1,000 runs in a season nine, times, exceeding 2,000 runs in a season once, 2,078 runs (av. 37.78) in 1947. He also took 152 catches, 2 stumpings and 3 wickets (av. 26.66) with a best of 2 for 19. Syd Brown was one of the finest fieldsman and could get down, pick the ball up and throw it in, all in one movement, whilst running in at full speed. He died in 1987.

Keith Robert Brown was born in Edmonton in 1963 and he debuted in 1984. He made an early impression with a century versus the touring Australians in 1985. He was a forceful and sometimes belligerent right-handed batsman who became the county’s sixth most prolific wicketkeeper, with 501 first-class dismissals (468 caught and 33 stumped) and was capped in 1990. He scored 10,487 runs at an average of 35.19, in 247 first-class matches. His thirteen centuries included an immaculate 200 not out versus Nottinghamshire at Lord’s in 1990. He is only the second Middlesex wicketkeeper to exceed 10,000 runs and 500 dismissals in first-class cricket. Upon retirement, he became a schoolmaster in Devon.

Born London in 1885, Clarence Bruce was succeeded to the title 3rd Baron Aberdare in 1929. A right-handed hard-hitting, middle-order batsman he attended Winchester School, before University. He represented Oxford University from 1905 to 1908, attaining blues in 1907 and 1908. He made his Middlesex debut in 1908 and played 62 times for the county until 1929. He scored 4,326 runs (av. 29.03) with a top score of 149 and he held 34 catches. An excellent rackets player he was the amateur champion in 1922 and 1931 and was doubles champion on ten occasions. He represented Oxford University at both rackets

and golf and for over 20 years worked for the International Olympic Executive. He also played cricket for Wales from 1925 to 1929. He died in 1957 motoring, near Kotor in Yugoslavia when he was drowned when the car he was travelling in went over a precipice into a river.

Roland Orlando Butcher was born in Barbados in 1953 and settled in England, when he was thirteen. He was a swashbuckling right-handed strokemaker, an athletic fielder and an occasional wicketkeeper. He scored 10,935 runs in 251 first-class matches with 17 centuries and taking 265 catches. He scored 4,640 runs in 257 limited-over matches with one hundred and 25 fifties, also taking 81 catches.He played briefly for England in three Tests on the 1980 West Indies tour and he was awarded the Walter Lawrence Trophy for the fastest century of 1987. He is now a leading cricket administrator in the West Indies.

Born at St. John's Wood, London in 1963, son of D.B. (Derbyshire and Oxford University), grandson of J.L. (Army), John Donald Carr was a right-handed opening batsman, off break bowler and useful fieldsman.

Educated at Repton, he attained blues all three years between 1983 and 1985 whilst at Oxford University. He represented Middlesex in 191 matches between 1983 and 1996. He accumulated 9,846 runs (av. 39.22) with 20 centuries including a highest score of 261 n.o. versus Gloucestershire at Lord's in 1995 including 43 fours. He took 33 wickets (av. 35.03) with a best performance of 6 for 61 versus and he held 243 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season five times with his best season being 1994 when he achieved 1,543 runs (av. 90.76) including six centuries and seven fifties.

He played minor county cricket for Hertfordshire in two spells between 1982 and 1984 and again between 1990 and 1991. In 1997 he was appointed the Cricket Operations Manager in the newly established England Cricket Board based at Lord's.

Born at Balham, South London in 1937, Ted Clark was a right-handed middle-order batsman and left-arm medium pace bowler. He represented the county 196 times from 1959 to 1976. He amassed 8.733 runs (av. 29.11) with a top score of 149, took 58 wickets (av. 32.46) with a best performance of 5 for 61 and he held 106 catches. He achieved 1,000 runs in a season five times with a best of 1,454 runs (av. 32.31) in 1964. He toured four times with M.C.C. to East Africa 1973/74, West Africa 1975/76 and Bangladesh in 1976/77 and 1978/79. He ceased to appear regularly for the county after 1966. After retiring he has served as a member of the Club’s General Committee.

Corey Collymore, the former West Indian fast bowler, was signed by Middlesex CCC in 2011 to add consistency and quality to the team’s inexperienced bowling attack. Collymore, born in Barbados on 21 December 1977, was 33 when he joined the club but his ageing legs rarely prevented him from being available for selection. In his first season with Middlesex he took 49 wickets at an average of 26.3 and conceded just 2.8 runs pre over.

Collymore’s consistently challenging bowling was one of the principle reasons why Middlesex gained promotion to Division 1 by winning the Division 2 title. The control he gave to a side made him a captain’s dream. It wasn’t just on the field where he provided a good influence. Collymore played a positive role in the early development of Steven Finn and Toby Roland-Jones. In three seasons at the club he took 86 first-class wickets at an average of 29.

Born at Hendon in 1918, Denis Charles Scott Compton the "Brylcream Boy" was an outstanding sportsman who played for Middlesex from 1936 to 1958 and during the winter months represented Arsenal (1935 to 1949) at soccer where he gained a wartime international cap, a league championship and F.A. Cup Winners medals. Playing 515 first-class matches he acquired 38,942 runs (av. 51.85) with 123 centuries and he reached a top score of 300 for M.C.C. versus North-Eastern Transvaal at Benoni in 1948/49, he took 622 wickets with a best of 7 for 36 with his spinners and he held 416 catches. Playing 78 Tests for England between 1937 and 1956/57 he accumulated 5,807 runs (av. 50.06) with 17 centuries. His top score was 278 versus Pakistan at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1954 and he toured abroad 8 times. He also played in India for Holkar and Europeans between 1944 and 1946. In 1947 he attained a record 18 first-class centuries whilst scoring 3,816 runs in the season. His 3rd wicket stand of 424 with Bill Edrich versus Somerset at Lord's in 1948 remains the county record for any wicket partnership. He was the first retired professional cricketer to serve as the county's President (1991-1997). He died in 1997.

Born at Woodford, Essex in 1912, Leslie Harry Compton, brother of course of Denis was a right-handed, lower order batsman, wicket-keeper and right-arm medium pace bowler. He represented Middlesex 272 times from 1938 to 1956 during which time he scored 5,814 runs (av. 16.75) with a single century of 107. As a wicket keeper he held 468 catches and took 131 stumpings and as an occasional bowler took 12 wickets (av. 47.41) with a best performance of 2 for 21. A noted soccer player, he was centre-half for Arsenal when they won the F.A. Cup in 1950 against Liverpool at Wembley (2-0) and in 1950/51 he gained two caps for England against Wales at Roker Park, Sunderland (4-2) and against Yugoslavia at Highbury, Arsenal (2-2). He died at Hendon, Middlesex in 1984.

Born at Skipton, Victoria, Australia in 1939, Alan Connolly was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed lower order batsman. He represented his native Victoria 83 times between 1959/60 and 1970/71 and Australia in 29 Tests between 1964/65 and 1970/71. He toured abroad six times to England in 1964 and 1968, South Africa in 1969/70, India in 1964/65 and 1969/70 and New Zealand in 1966/67. He joined Middlesex in 1969 and played 44 times for the county until 1970/71 when he returned to Australia and retired with back trouble. During the 1969 season, he took 74 wickets (av. 23.24). His best bowling performance in first-class matches was 9 for 67 for Victoria versus Queensland at Brisbane in 1964/65.

Born at Enfield St. Mary, Jamaica in 1961, Norman Cowans was on the Lord's groundstaff in 1979 and after a couple of years at Lord's he joined the Middlesex staff in 1980/81 for the tour of Zimbabwe. He made his county debut in 1981 and was a

regular member of the team until 1993 when he left the county after his Benefit Year to join Hampshire. For Middlesex with his right-arm fast bowling he took 532 wickets (22.57) with 5 wickets in an innings 19 times. His best bowling performance was 6 for 61 versus Leicestershire at Leicester in 1985. As a tail end right-handed batsman his best score was 66 versus Surrey at Lord's in 1984. He played 19 Tests for England and toured abroad seven times. His best performances were both against Australia during 1982/83 when he took 6 for 77 at Melbourne and scored 36 at Perth. He was capped in 1984 and was also a useful one-day bowler, in the Sunday League in 1991 against Lancashire at Lord's he returned figures of 6 for 9. Hampshire released him after two seasons in 1995.

Gerald Edward Victor Crutchley was born in 1890 and was a dependable right-handed middle-order batsman and leg-break googly/right-arm medium fast bowler. He scored 67 and took 2/46 for Harrow v Eton at Lord’s in 1908. He was wounded while serving with the Scots Guards and became a prisoner of war for much of the Great War. He scored 1,384 runs and took 67 wickets in 51 first-class matches. He became a Committee stalwart and served as the County President (1958-1962). His son Edward also represented the County. Gerry died in 1969.

Born at St. Philip, Barbados in 1956, and the gentle, sensitive, Wayne 'The Diamond' Daniel was without doubt an extremely quick right-arm fast bowler and right-handed tail end batsman. He represented the West Indies in 10 Tests between 1975/76 and 1983/84 together with 18 one-day internationals and he toured abroad on three occasions. He played for his native Barbados between 1975 and 1985 and joined Middlesex in 1977 after being noticed during the West Indies tour of England in 1976 when he had been a member of the touring party. He represented Middlesex 213 times taking 685 wickets (av. 22.02) with 5 wickets in an innings 22 times and with a best performance of 9 for 61 versus Glamorgan at Swansea in 1982. His best summer for the county was his Benefit Year in 1985 when he bagged 79 wickets (av. 26.72). As a tail end batsman he scored 1,043 runs (av. 10.32) with a top score of 53 n.o. versus Yorkshire at Lord's in 1981 and he held 52 catches. A useful bowler in one-day domestic cricket he took 7 for 12 against Minor Counties (East) at Ipswich and 6 for 17 against Sussex at Hove in the Benson & Hedges Cup in 1978.

Born at North Latchford, Cheshire in 1926, John Dewes was a left-handed opening batsman, right-arm medium pace bowler and excellent out fielder. Schooled at Aldenham, he went on to Cambridge University where he attained blues all three years between 1948 and 1950. He represented Middlesex from 1948 to 1956 on 62 occasions scoring 8,564 runs (av. 41.77) with eighteen centuries and this included a top score of 212 for Cambridge University versus Sussex at Hove in 1950. He took 2 wickets (av. 33.50) with a best of 1 for 0 and he held 48 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season three times with a best of 2,432 runs (av. 59.31) in 1950. He represented England in five Tests between 1948 and 1950/51 scoring 121 runs (av. 12.10) with a top score of 67 and he toured abroad once to Australia and New Zealand in 1950/51. His appearances for Middlesex were restricted during the 1950's by his profession as a teacher. He made his first-class debut at Lord's in 1945 for England versus Australia and his final appearance for L.E.G. Ames' XI in 1957. A good hockey player he gained blues in 1949 and 1950. His son A.R. represented Cambridge University between 1978-79 attaining a blue in 1978.

Neil Dexter was signed from Kent in 2009. Dexter is primarily a right handed top/middle order batsman but he developed his medium pace swing bowling to such an extent that he could rightly be described as an all-rounder.  He was born in Johannesburg on 21 August 1984 but played most of his youth cricket in Durban.

Dexter made an immediate impression at Middlesex and went on to captain the club between 2010 and 2013. During his time in charge the club gained promotion to Division 1 of the County Championship by winning the Division 2 title. Dexter made more than 235 appearances for the club in all forms of cricket. In these games he scored more than 7,100 runs and took 174 wickets. He left Middlesex CCC in 2015 to play for Leicestershire CCC.

The son of George a Kent stumper of the 1940's, born a Man of Kent in 1957, Paul Rupert Downton, was a wicket-keeper and useful right-handed batsman, who represented his native county Kent from 1977 to 1979 as deputy to Alan Knott until his move to Middlesex in 1980. He played 314 first-class matches, scoring 8,270 runs with a top score of 126 n.o. versus Oxford University at The Parks, Oxford in 1986 and he took 779 dismissals (690 catches, 89 stumpings). Whilst scoring his maiden first-class century, 104, he also added 289 for the 5th wicket with Clive Radley versus Northamptonshire at Uxbridge in 1985. After suffering a freak eye injury when hit by a flying bail in the Sunday League match versus Hampshire at Basingstoke in 1990, he retired in 1991. For England he played 30 Tests, touring abroad 7 times, he scored 785 runs with a top score of 74 versus India at Delhi in 1984/85 and he achieved 75 dismissals. Since retiring he has concentrated on working in the city and is a member of the Club’s General Committee.

Born at Clophill, Bedfordshire in 1893, Jack Durston was a right-arm fast bowler, latterly medium pace and a useful lower-order hard-hitting right-handed batsman. He represented Middlesex 349 times from 1919 to 1933 taking 1,178 wickets (av. 21.97) with a best performance of 8 for 27 and he scored 3,569 runs (av. 11.63) with a top score of 92 n.o. versus Northamptonshire at Lord's in 1930 and he held 230 catches. He took 100 wickets in a season six times with a best of 136 (av. 19.50) in 1921. He toured abroad twice with Cahn to Jamaica in 1928/29 and with Brinckman to South America in 1937/38. He played a single Test for England against Australia in 1921 when he took 5 wickets (av. 27.20) and scored 8 runs. Standing at 6ft 5ins tall he was a more than useful goalkeeper for Brentford. He died at Norwood Green, Southall, Middlesex in 1965.

Born at Lusaka, North Rhodesia in 1951, Phillipe-Henri Edmonds made his first-class debut for Middlesex in 1971 after taking 9 wickets versus Leicestershire at Fenner's in only his second first-class match for Cambridge University. He led Cambridge in

his final year in 1973 before taking his slow left-arm skills to Lord's where he represented the county until 1987, although he did return for a single match in 1992. He played a total of 391 first-class matches, scoring 7,651 runs with a top score of 142 versus Glamorgan at Swansea in 1984. He took 1,246 wickets with a best of 8 for 53 versus Hampshire at Bournemouth in 1984 and he held 345 catches. For England he played in 51 Tests, between 1975 and 1987, touring abroad 5 times, he took 125 wickets with a best of 7 for 66 versus Pakistan at Karachi in 1977/78 and he scored 875 runs. His wife Frances wrote accounts of his last two tours. Now engaged in business he also writes and commentates on the game. He served as the Chairman of the Club’s General Committee (1999-2007) and Chairman of the Management Committee.

Norfolk born in 1916, Bill Edrich was a fearless all-rounder who won the DFC as a daylight RAF bomber pilot during the Second World War and was one of four brothers from a cricketing family who went on to play first-class cricket. He represented Middlesex from 1937 to 1958, (1953 to 1957 as captain) and played 571 first-class matches, scoring 36,965 runs with 86 centuries with a top score of 267 n.o. versus Northamptonshire at Northampton in 1947. He also achieved 479 wickets with a best performance of 7 for 48 and he also took 529 catches. Playing 39 Tests for England between 1938 and 1954/55 he scored 2,440 runs with a best of 219 versus South Africa at Durban in 1938/39 and he toured abroad five times. He scored eight double hundreds for Middlesex. He exceeded 2,000 runs in a season 9 times and hit 3,589 runs including 12 centuries in 1947 an aggregate only exceeded by Denis Compton. He represented Norfolk at minor county level and also played soccer for Norwich City and Tottenham Hotspur before the war. He died at Chesham, Buckinghamshire in 1986.

An off-spin bowler and stubborn right-handed batsman John Emburey was born at Peckham, London in 1952. He has played for Middlesex since 1973 in 345 matches taking 1,117 wickets with a best of 8 for 40 versus Hampshire at Lord's in 1993. He has scored 8,469 runs with a top score of 133 versus Essex at Chelmsford in 1983 and he has held 338 catches. His best season was 1983 when he took 103 wickets (av. 17.33). Representing England in 63 Tests, twice as captain versus West Indies in 1988. He has taken 147 wickets with a best of 7 for 78 versus Australia at Sydney in 1986/87 and he has scored 1,705 runs with a best performance of 75 versus New Zealand at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1986. He has toured abroad on eight occasions although his international cricket appearances would no doubt have been greater had he not toured twice with unofficial rebel England teams to South Africa in 1981/82 and 1989/90. He played Currie Cup matches for Western Province between 1982 and 1984. In 1995 after his Testimonial season with Middlesex he joined Northamptonshire for whom he played until 1997 before acting as County Coach for the 1998 season. After leaving Northamptonshire he concentrated on cricket commentary for Sky Television and in 2001 Emburey was appointed the Coach of Middlesex, a post he continues to hold.

Born at Cartagena, Spain in 1903, Tommy Enthoven was a right-handed middle-order batsman and a right-arm medium pace bowler. Schooled at Harrow, he went on to Cambridge University where he attained blues all four years between 1923 and 1926. He made his Middlesex debut in 1925 and represented the county 123 times until 1936. He amassed 7,362 runs (av. 27.16) with 9 centuries and a top score of 139. His best season was 1926 when he hit 1,129 runs (av. 31.36). He also took 252 wickets (av. 32.13) with a best performance of 6 for 64 and he held 78 catches. He captained Cambridge University in 1926 and Middlesex jointly with Nigel Haig between 1933 and 1934. He toured with M.C.C. to Canada in 1937 and his final first-class match was for M.C.C. in 1948. He died at Kensington, London in 1975.

Born at Que Que, Rhodesia in 1949, Norman Featherstone was a right-handed middle order batsman and useful off break bowler. He represented Middlesex between 1968 and 1979 and was capped in 1971. A member of the South African Schools Team to England in 1967, he made his first-class debut in South Africa for Transvaal 'B' in 1967/68 in the Currie Cup. His best performances for Middlesex were 147 versus Yorkshire at Scarborough in 1975 and 5 for 32 versus Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1978. His best season was when he achieved 1,156 runs (av. 35.03) and against Kent at Canterbury he scored 127 n.o. and 100 n.o. in 1975. He received a Benefit in 1979 and after this moved to Wales and represented Glamorgan from 1980 until the end of the 1982 season.

Stephen Fleming was born in Christchurch, New Zealand in 1973. He is a prolific right-handed batsman who is widely acknowledged as one of the leading captains in the world cricket today. He played county cricket for Middlesex in 2001, scoring 1,091 first-class runs at an average of 51.95 with four hundreds and six fifties, taking 22 catches. He has also represented the New Zealand teams Canterbury and Wellington, as well as the English county teams Yorkshire in 2003 and Nottinghamshire, whom he captained to the 2005 County Championship. In an outstanding career, he has represented New Zealand in 96 Tests and 250 List A limited-over Internationals. In all first-class cricket, he has scored 13, 154 runs in 204 matches, with 27 hundreds and 77 fifties. He has taken 268 catches.

Born at Paddington, London in 1866, Francis Ford was son of W.A. (M.C.C. 1839), brother of A.F.J. (Middlesex) and W.J. (Middlesex), nephew of G.J. (Oxford University), uncle of N.M. (Derbyshire and Middlesex) and great-uncle of J.R.T. Barclay (Sussex). An attractive left-handed middle-order batsman, slow left-arm bowler and excellent slip fieldsman, he attended Repton School before going to Cambridge University. He attained blues all four years between 1887 and 1890 and captained the side in 1899. He made his Middlesex debut in 1886 and represented the county in 102 matches until 1899. He amassed

7,359 runs (av. 27.05) with 14 centuries and a top score of 191. He hit 1,000 runs in a season twice with a best of 1,195 (av. 28.45) in 1899. He bagged 200 wickets (av. 23.78) with a best of 7 for 65 and he held 131 catches. He played five Tests for England in Australia in 1894/95 when he toured with Stoddart's team scoring 48 runs (av. 18.66) and taking a single wicket. His final first-class match was for an England XII in 1908. A noted goalkeeper he was awarded a blue for soccer whilst at Cambridge. He died at Burwash, Sussex in 1940.

Once the finest right-arm medium-pace bowler available to England, Angus Fraser was born at Billinge, Lancashire, in 1965 and he made his Middlesex debut in 1984. He was a permanent member of the county team until missing two complete seasons due to back and hip injuries in 1991 and 1992. Making a welcome return in 1993 he assisted Middlesex to the County Championship with 50 wickets. During the same season he returned to the England team making his twelfth Test appearance versus Australia in the Sixth Test at the Oval, when he won the Man of the Match award by taking match figures of 8 for 131 in helping England to their only victory of the series. His career best figures are 7 for 40 versus Leicestershire at Lord's in 1993 and as a right-handed late-order batsman his best score is 92 versus Surrey at the Oval in 1990. In all he took 177 wickets in 46 Tests for England. In 2001 he was appointed County Captain having taken over from the Australian Justin Langer. He retired in April 2002 to take up a job with The Independent newspaper as leading cricket correspondent and he is a regular member of the Sky Sports commentary team as well as on BBC Radio’s Test Match Special.

Born at Old Warden, Bedfordshire in 1933, Bob Gale was a left-handed opening batsman and right-arm medium pace or leg-break bowler. Schooled at Bedford Modern, he made his first-class debut for the Army in 1955 before representing Middlesex 219 times between 1956 and 1965. He amassed 11,234 runs (av. 29.10) with thirteen centuries and with a top score of 200 versus Glamorgan at Rodney Parade, Newport in 1962. He hit 1,000 runs in a season six times with a best of 2,211 (av. 38.78) in 1962. He achieved 47 wickets (av. 37.19) with a best performance of 4 for 57 and he held 124 catches. He toured abroad three times with Swanton to West Indies in 1960/61, Brown to East Africa in 1961/62 and M.C.C. to South America in 1964/65. His final first-class match was for the Free Foresters in 1968. Elected to the general committee in 1989 he has served as chairman of the cricket sub-committee until 1998 and was President of the club from 2000-04. He remains a life Vice President of the Club.

 

Mike Gatting, an aggressive right-handed batsman, right-arm bowler and fine fieldsman was born at Kingsbury, Middlesex in 1957 and he made his Middlesex debut in 1975 at 18 years of age and was capped at 20. Appointed captain in 1983 he led the county until part way through the 1996 season to three county championships. He amassed 30,114 runs with 96 centuries including a highest score of 258 versus Somerset at Bath in 1984. He has taken 154 wickets with a best performance of 5 for 34 versus Glamorgan at Swansea in 1982 and he has held 395 catches. His best season was 1984 when he accumulated 2,257 runs (av. 68.39). Representing England in 74 Tests, 23 as captain he scored 4,227 runs with 9 centuries including a top score of 207 versus India at Madras in 1984/85. He has toured abroad twelve times with various teams and his best tour was without doubt winning the Ashes and the Perth Challenge in Australia in 1986/87. He was awarded an OBE in 1987 for his services to cricket. He captained an unofficial rebel England tour to South Africa in 1989/90. Retiring from first-class cricket in 1998 his last match was against Derbyshire in the county championship. Since then he has been appointed the County Coach a post he held until the end of the 2000 season when he was replaced by former team mate John Emburey in 2001. He is currently engaged as the President of the Lord’s Taverners.

Born at Arima, Trinidad in 1953, Larry Gomes was a left-handed top order batsman, right-arm medium pace or off-break bowler and good close fieldsman. He represented his native Trinidad from 1971/72 to 1987/88 and Middlesex in 42 matches from 1973 to 1976. He scored 1,199 runs (av. 22.20) with a top score of 93 n.o. versus Worcestershire at Lord's in 1975, he collected 23 wickets (av. 40.13) with a best of 4 for 22 versus Yorkshire at Bradford in 1973 and he held 11 catches. During his career he amassed 12,982 runs (av. 40.56) with 32 centuries and a top score of 200 n.o. for the West Indies versus Queensland at Brisbane in 1981/82. He represented West Indies in sixty Tests between 1976 and 1986/87. He scored 3,171 runs (av. 39.64)

with nine centuries including a top score of 143 versus England at Edgbaston, Birmingham in 1984 and he took 15 wickets (av. 62.00) with a best of 2 for 20 versus Australia at Sydney in 1981/82 and he held 18 catches.

Born at Taplow, Buckinghamshire in 1957, Ian Gould was a left-handed middle-order batsman and wicket keeper. He represented Middlesex 90 times from 1975 to 1980/81 and was capped in 1977 before moving to Sussex who he represented 195 times between 1981 and 1990. He also played one season in New Zealand for Auckland in 1979/80 and he captained Sussex in 1987 and played in eighteen One-Day Internationals for England. He played 297 first-class matches scoring 8,756 runs (av. 26.05) with four centuries and a top score of 128 for Middlesex versus Worcestershire at Worcester in 1978. He held 536 catches and took 67 stumpings and achieved 7 wickets (av. 52.14) with a best of 3 for 10 for Sussex versus Surrey at The Oval in 1989. He toured abroad three times with Vic Lewis' XI to Pakistan in 1980/81, Middlesex to Zimbabwe in 1980/81, England to Australia and New Zealand in 1982/83. After retiring he returned to the county as 2nd XI coach until the end of the 2000 season and he is now a first class umpire.

Born at Tottenham, Middlesex in 1915, Laurie Gray was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed lower order batsman. He represented the county 204 times between 1934 and 1951. He achieved 637 wickets (av. 25.13) with a best performance of 8 for 59 and he scored 901 runs (av. 7.38) with a best score of 35 n.o. He also held 125 catches and in 1946 he took 102 wickets (av. 18.43). He later became a first-class umpire and stood between 1953 and 1970, standing in two Test Matches between 1955 and 1963. He died at Langdon Hills, Essex in 1983.

Born at Kensington, London in 1887, Nigel Haig was nephew of Lord Harris (Kent). A right-handed middle order batsman, right-arm medium fast bowler and good fieldsman he was schooled at Eton. He represented Middlesex 417 times between 1912 and 1934 scored 12,289 runs (av. 20.79) with eleven centuries and a top score of 131 versus Sussex at Lord's in 1920. He achieved 931 wickets (av. 26.06) with a best of 7 for 33 versus Kent at Canterbury in 1920 and he held 182 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season six times with a best of 1,552 (av. 25.02) in 1929 and he took 100 wickets in a season five times with a best of 129 (av. 24.17) in 1929. He achieved the coveted double three times. He represented England in five Tests in 1929/30 when he toured with M.C.C. to the West Indies. He took 13 wickets (av. 34.46) with a best of 3 for 73 and scored 126 runs (av. 14.00) with a top score of 47 and he held 4 catches. During the period 1929-1934 he captained the county, the latter two seasons jointly with H.J. Enthoven and was also Hon. Secretary. He played three other sports to a high standard; tennis, rackets and golf. He was a Test selector in 1929 and he made his final first-class appearance in 1936 for H.G. Leveson-Gower's XI. He died at Eastbourne, Sussex in 1966.

Born at St. Just-in-Roseland, Cornwall in 1944, Mike 'Pasty' Harris was a right-handed opening batsman, leg-break bowler and wicket-keeper. He represented Middlesex 72 times between 1964 and 1968 before he moved to Nottinghamshire, whom he represented in 261 matches between 1969 and 1982. He spent two winters abroad with Eastern Province in 1971/72 and Wellington in 1975/76 and he toured the West Indies in 1974/75 with Derrick Robins XI. During his career he amassed 19,196 runs (av. 36.70) with 41 centuries and a top score of 201 n.o. for Nottinghamshire versus Glamorgan at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1973. He hit 1,000 runs in a season eleven times, achieving 2,000 once. His best season being 2,238 (av. 50.86) in 1971. He bagged 79 wickets (av. 43.78) with a best of 4 for 16 versus Warwickshire at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1969 and he held 288 catches and took 14 stumpings. He later became a first-class umpire.

Born at Holder's Hill, Barbados in 1956, Desmond 'Dessie' Haynes was an attractive right-handed opening batsman and right-arm medium and leg break bowler. He represented his native Barbados between 1976/77 and 1991/92, acting as captain in 1990/91. He joined Middlesex in 1989, gained his cap in his first season with the county and went on to represent county until 1994. He accumulated 7,071 runs (av. 49.10) with a highest score of 255 n.o. versus Sussex at Uxbridge in 1990. His best season was 1990 when he recorded 2,346 runs for the county. He also made over 4,000 runs in the three domestic limited-overs competition with his highest score being 149 n.o. versus Lancashire at Old Trafford, Manchester in the 1990 NatWest Trophy tie. He represented West Indies in 111 Tests between 1977/78 and 1992/93 during which time he amassed 7,250 runs (av. 42.65) with 18 centuries and a top score of 184 versus England at Lord's in 1980. He toured abroad nineteen times with the West Indies throughout the cricketing world. He represented Scotland in the Benson & Hedges Cup in 1983 and Western Province in the late 1990's. Since retiring he has concentrated on coaching and has served Sussex and Hampshire.

Born at Chalfont St. Giles, Buckinghamshire, in 1867, 'Jack' Hearne was an outstanding right-arm medium-pace bowler and after being summoned by telegram to play in his first championship match at Lord's, he took six Nottinghamshire wickets. Representing Middlesex 453 times from 1888 until 1923, he collected 3,061 wickets (av. 17.75) and he held 426 catches mainly at slip. He was cousin of the three Hearne brothers who represented Kent and 'Young Jack' of Middlesex. He holds the record for being the earliest to achieve 100 wickets in a season on 12th June 1896. He topped 100 wickets in a season on 15 occasions and he achieved 200 wickets in a season three times. As a Test player his highlight in 12 Tests was taking a hat-trick versus Australia at Headingley, Leeds in 1899 when he dismissed Clem Hill, Syd Gregory and Monty Noble for 'ducks'. He later

acted as coach for Oxford University and the Maharaja of Patiala in India before being elected one of the first professionals to the club committee, he died at his birthplace in 1944.

'Young Jack' Hearne, joined the groundstaff at Lord's in 1906 as a scorecard boy and he developed into a fine right-handed all-rounder. He represented Middlesex from 1909 to 1936 playing 647 first-class matches, accumulating 37,252 runs with 96 centuries and he recorded a top score of 285 n.o. versus Essex at the County Ground, Leyton in 1929. That innings was in fact the last of his eleven double centuries for the county. He took 1,839 wickets with a best performance of 9 for 61 and he held 348 catches. Playing 24 Tests for England between 1911/12 and 1926 he scored 806 runs with a top score of 114 versus Australia at Melbourne in 1911/12 and he took 30 wickets with a best return of 5 for 49 versus South Africa at Johannesburg in 1913/14. He accumulated 1,000 runs in a season nineteen times and he achieved the coveted double five times and but for the First World War he would have easily achieved a hundred first-class centuries. He later owned a sports shop and he died at West Drayton, Middlesex in 1965.

The much-loved 'Patsy' Hendren was born at Turnham Green in 1889 and he joined the Lord's groundstaff in 1905 as a right-handed batsman. He represented Middlesex from 1907 to 1937 playing 833 first-class matches, scoring a mammoth 57,611 runs (av. 50.80) with 170 centuries. His top score was 301 n.o. versus Worcestershire at Dudley in 1933 and he also held 754 catches. He exceeded 1,000 runs in a season 21 times and holds the county record for the most runs in a season for the county 2,669 in 1923. The crowd at Lord's stood and sung he's a jolly good fellow on the occasion of his last innings for the county versus neighbours Surrey in 1937. A notable soccer wing forward he played for Brentford, Queen's Park Rangers, Manchester City and Coventry City. Playing 51 Tests for England between 1920/21 and 1934/35 he amassed 3,525 runs with a top score of 205 n.o. versus West Indies at Port-of-Spain in 1929/30. He toured abroad six times and after retiring he coached at Harrow School and later for Sussex. He followed this by acting as Middlesex county scorer between 1952 and 1960. He died at Tooting Bec, London in 1962.

Born at Shirley, Southampton, Hampshire in 1946, the son of O.W. 'Lofty' (Hampshire), Bob Herman was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed lower order batsman. He represented the county 92 times between 1965 and 1971 before he joined Hampshire. He played 89 matches for Hampshire between 1972 and 1977 and wintered abroad twice in South Africa, playing for Border in 1971/72 and Griqualand West in 1974/75. During his career he achieved 506 wickets (av. 26.37) with a best of 8 for 42 versus Warwickshire at Portsmouth in 1972 and he scored 1,426 runs (av. 10.18) with a top score of 56 versus Worcestershire at Portsmouth in 1972 and he held 74 catches. He later played for Dorset between 1978 and 1979 in the minor county championship and between 1980 and 1982 was a first-class umpire.

Born at Lower Clapton, London in 1935, Ron Hooker was a right-arm medium pace bowler and right-handed middle order batsman. He represented the county in 300 matches and amassed 8,222 runs (av. 22.16) with five centuries and a top score of 137 versus Kent at Gravesend in 1959. He bagged 490 wickets (av. 27.46) with a best performance of 7 for 18 and he held 301 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season twice with a best of 1,449 (av. 30.18) in 1959. He scored an 87 minute hundred in 1966 against Somerset at Weston-Super-Mare when he came to the wicket with Middlesex on 110 for 5, he hit 102 out of 120 and thanks to this the county went on to win the match easily. In one of his last performances for Middlesex in the John Player Sunday League he took six wickets for just six runs as Surrey were dismissed for only 83.

Born at Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey in 1959, Simon Hughes was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed tail end batsman. He represented Middlesex between 1980 and 1991, being capped in 1981 an it was no surprise as a former Durham University student, he joined the new first-class county Durham immediately after his Benefit Year in 1991 in readiness for their first season. His best performances for Middlesex were 7 for 35 versus Surrey at the Oval in 1986 and 53 with the bat versus Cambridge University at Fenner's in 1988. He played for Durham until the end of the 1993 season, since when he has become a full-time sports journalist and television commentator on cricket. His widely acclaimed book on county cricket 'A Lot of Hard Yakka' has been well received in cricketing circles.

Born at Stafford in 1904, Joe Hulme was a right-handed middle order batsman, right-arm medium bowler and superb deep fieldsman. He represented Middlesex 223 times between 1929 and 1939 and accumulated 8,103 runs (av. 26.56) with twelve centuries and a top score of 143. He hit 1,000 runs in a season three times with a best of 1,258 (av. 34.94) in 1934. He bagged 89 wickets (av. 36.40) with a best of 4 for 44 and he held 110 catches. A well-respected soccer player he appeared at outside right for Blackburn Rovers, Arsenal and Huddersfield Town. He also played nine internationals for England between 1927 and 1929 scoring four goals. He died at Winchmore Hill, Middlesex in 1991.

Hutton is one of the great names of English cricket and Ben Hutton is the grandson of Len Hutton, the great Yorkshire and England batsman His father, Richard Hutton, played for Yorkshire and England too. Ben did not go on to play for England but he had a good career with Middlesex CCC, playing just short of 250 games for the club.

Hutton was awarded his county cap in 2003 and captained Middlesex between 2005 and 2006. He was born in Johannesberg, South Africa on 29 January 1977 before attending Radley College in Oxfordshire where he formed a great friendship with Andrew Strauss, the former Middlesex and England captain. Ben was a top order left handed batsman and useful medium pacer. He was an excellent fielder too. In all her scored almost 7,500 runs for Middlesex CCC and took 86 wickets.

 

Richard Johnson was born in Chertsey, Surrey in 1974. A devastating right-arm fast medium bowler who took a memorable 10/45 at Derby in 1992. He took 273 wickets for the county in 89 first-class matches. His career has been blighted by injury, but

he has served Middlesex and his current county Somerset well. He later successfully represented England in three Test matches in 2003.

Born at Park Royal, Middlesex in 1942, Keith Jones was a right-arm medium pace bowler and right-handed lower order batsman. He represented the county 117 times between 1967 and 1974. He scored 2,064 runs (av. 17.20) with a top score of 57 n.o. versus Surrey at The Oval in 1972 and he bagged 242 wickets (av. 27.28) with a best performance of 7 for 52 versus Warwickshire at Coventry in 1971. He later played for Bedfordshire between 1975 and 1989 in the minor county championship. His last first-class match was for the Minor Counties versus the West Indies at Torquay in 1976.

E C Joyce (1999-to date)

Ed Joyce was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1978 and educated at Trinity College, Dublin. He is an exciting left-handed batsman with a wide selection of strokes who made his county debut in 1999 and was capped in 2002. He has scored 5,451 runs in 76 first-class matches for the County at an average of 48.23. A former Ireland international, who has now qualified to play for England. He appears to have an illustrious career before him.

Born at Pinelands, Cape Town, South Africa in 1975, Jacques Kallis is right-handed top order batsman, useful right-arm fast medium bowler and an excellent slip fieldsman. He has represented his native Western Province since 1993/94 and made his debut for Middlesex in 1997 and was capped in his initial season with the county. He accumulated 1,034 runs (av. 47.00) with 4 hundreds including a highest score of 172 n.o. versus Worcestershire at Kidderminster. He took 32 wickets (av. 20.46) with a best performance of 5 for 54 versus Kent at Lord's and he held 15 catches. He won the man of the match award in the NatWest Trophy 2nd Round match when he scored exactly 100 and took 4 for 47 versus Gloucestershire at Uxbridge. He has represented South Africa in 87 Tests since 1996/97 scoring 6833 runs (av. 55.55) with 20 centuries of which his highest score so far is 189*versus Zimbabwe in 2001/02. He is one of the younger generation of talented batsman presently playing cricket in the world and continues to be an integral member of the South African team.

Born at Hartford, Cheshire in 1953, the younger son of Lord Rochester, Tim Lamb was schooled at Shrewsbury before going on to Oxford University. He made his first-class debut in 1973 and he attained blues both years in 1973 and 1974. He represented Middlesex in 36 matches between 1974 and 1977 before he moved to Northamptonshire for whom he played 108 matches between 1978 and 1983. During his career with the ball, he took 361 wickets (av. 28.97) with a best performance of 7 for 56 for Northamptonshire versus Cambridge University at Fenner's in 1980. With the bat he scored 1,274 runs (av. 12.49) with a top score of 77 for Middlesex versus Nottinghamshire at Lord's in 1976 and he also held 40 catches. He moved back to Lord's in 1983 when he was appointed Secretary/General Manager of Middlesex, a post he held until 1987, when he moved to the position of Cricket Secretary of the Test and County Cricket Board (TCCB). In 1996 after the retirement of Alan Smith, he was appointed Chief Executive of the TCCB and subsequently the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) based at Lord's, a position he held until his resignation in September 2004.

Born at Perth, Western Australia in 1970, Justin Langer is a left-handed top order batsman, right-arm medium bowler and occasional wicket keeper. He has represented his native Western Australia in the Sheffield Shield since making his debut in 1991/92 and has played over 75 Tests for Australia. His highest career score so far is 274 n.o. for Western Australia versus South Australia at the WACA Perth in 1996/97. He was capped in 1998 and enjoyed a good initial season with the county. Whilst scoring 166, he added a county record 372 for the first wicket with Mike Gatting (241) against Essex at Southgate in 1998 and completed the season with 1,448 runs (av. 62.95) with 4 centuries of which his highest was 233 n.o. versus Somerset at Lord's. He took a single wicket against Northamptonshire at Lord's and he held 15 catches.

Born at Kingston, Jamaica in 1943, Amritt Harrichand known as 'Harry' Latchman was a lower order right-handed batsman and leg-break and googly bowler. He represented Middlesex from 1965 to 1973 playing 170 first-class matches before moving on to Nottinghamshire between 1974 and 1976 where he played a further 40 first-class matches. In his 210 first-class matches he scored 2,333 runs (av. 13.25) with a top score of 96, bagged 487 wickets (av. 27.90) with a best performance of 7 for 65 and he held 107 catches. He toured abroad once in 1967/68 with an International XI to Ceylon and India and has toured in recent years with M.C.C. teams to Italy, U.S.A. and Japan. He played two seasons of minor county cricket for Cambridgeshire between 1977 and 1978. A regular visitor to Lord's he is presently cricket coach at Merchant Taylors' School in Northwood, Middlesex.

Born at Marylebone, London in 1890, Harry Lee was the brother of F.S. (Middlesex and Somerset) and J.W. (Middlesex and Somerset). A solid right-handed opening batsman and right-arm slow medium off break bowler he represented Middlesex 401

times between 1911 and 1934. He amassed 18,594 runs (av. 29.94) with twenty-three hundreds and with a top score of 243 n.o. versus Nottinghamshire at Lord's in 1921. He hit 1,000 runs in a season thirteen times with a best of 1,995 (av. 37.64) in 1929. He bagged 340 wickets (av. 32.54) with a best performance of 8 for 39 versus Gloucestershire at Cheltenham College in 1923 and he held 181 catches. Whilst coaching in South Africa in 1930/31 he was co-opted to the England touring party and played in a single Test for England scoring 19 runs in two innings (av. 9.50). He played cricket in India during winters twice in 1917/18 for Cooch-Behar's XI and for an England XI in 1918/19. He later became a first-class umpire standing between 1935 and 1946 and he later coached at Downside School from 1949 to 1953. He also wrote the book Forty Years of English Cricket. He died at Westminster, London in 1981.

Born at Teddington, Middlesex in 1867, Slade Lucas learnt his early cricket whilst at Merchant Taylors' School. A right-handed middle order batsman and right-arm medium pace bowler he represented Middlesex in 73 matches between 1891 and 1900. During his career he accumulated 2,685 runs (av. 18.64) with a single three figure score of 185 and he took 6 wickets (av. 61.00) with a best of 2 for 44 and he also held 42 catches. He toured abroad twice with Lord Hawke to North America in 1894 and with the first M.C.C. side to the West Indies in 1894/95. A well respected hockey player, he was captain of Teddington Hockey Club, for many seasons. He died at Franklands Village, Haywards Heath, Sussex in 1942.

Born at Merchiston, Edinburgh, Scotland in 1869, Gregor MacGregor was a right-handed lower order batsman and noted wicket keeper. After attending Uppingham School, he went on to Cambridge University where he attained blues all four years between 1888 and 1891. He made his Middlesex debut versus Lancashire in 1892 and represented the county in 184 matches until 1907. For Middlesex he accumulated 4,846 runs (av. 19.61) with two hundreds and a top score of 141 and he held 280 catches and took 111 stumpings. He played eight Tests for England between 1890 and 1893 scoring 96 runs (av. 12.00) with a top score of 31 and he took 14 catches and 3 stumpings. He toured abroad twice with Lord Sheffield to Australia in 1891/92 and with M.C.C. to North America in 1907. He captained Cambridge University in 1891 and Middlesex from 1899 to 1907. A brilliant rugby footballer at full-back and centre he represented Cambridge University in the Varsity matches of 1889 and 1890 and between 1889 and 1890 he represented his native Scotland in thirteen internationals. In 1890 he scored 131 out of a total of 730 for 9 declared by Cambridge University against Sussex at Hove, which was the highest second innings total in a first-class match in England. In his first season as Middlesex skipper Somerset were defeated inside just 4 hours and 15 minutes. He was a Test selector in 1902 and from 1916 until his death was Hon. Treasurer. He died at Marylebone, London in 1919.

Born at Winchmore Hill, Middlesex in 1888 Frank Mann learnt his cricket at Malvern in Worcestershire before playing for Cambridge University from 1908 to 1911. A lusty right-handed batsman and occasional right-arm slow bowler, he represented Middlesex from 1909 to 1931 (1921 to 1928 as captain) winning a famous championship at his first attempt in 1921. He played 398 first-class matches, scoring 13,235 runs with 9 centuries and with a top score of 194. Captaining England in his 5 Tests versus South Africa in 1922/23 he won 14 of the 22 tour matches including the Test series 2-1 with wins at Cape Town and Durban. He scored 281 runs with a top score of 84 in the third Test at Durban; he later became a Test selector in 1930 and subsequently became President of the club. He died at Milton-Lilbourne, Wiltshire in 1964.

George Mann was born at Byfleet, Surrey in 1917 and captained Eton, before representing Cambridge University in 1938 and 1939. A powerful middle-order batsman particularly strong on the leg-side, he once hit a six straight over the main football stand roof at Headingley on to the adjacent rugby field. Playing for Middlesex from 1937 to 1954 he played 166 first-class matches, scoring 6,350 runs with a career best 136 n.o. for England versus South Africa at Port Elizabeth in 1948/49. Captaining the county in 1948 and 1949, he was unable to lead the 1950/51 M.C.C. tour to Australia due to commitments in his family owned brewery, but still played 7 Tests between 1948 and 1949. The Mann family provided the only example of successive generations skippering England in a single Test. He later acted as TCCB Chairman from 1978 to 1983 following the 'Packer' affair and subsequently became President of M.C.C. in 1984/85. He died in 2001.

Born at Newbury, Berkshire in 1955, Bill Merry was a right-arm medium pace bowler and right-handed lower order batsman. He represented Middlesex in 26 matches between 1979 and 1982 during which time the championship was won twice in 1980 and 1982 not to mention the last Gillette Cup against Surrey at Lord's also in 1980. He bagged 52 wickets (av. 33.15) with a best performance of 4 for 24 versus Somerset at Taunton in 1980 and he scored 50 runs (av. 6.25) with a highest score of 14 n.o. versus Oxford University at the Parks in 1981 and he also held 6 catches. He toured abroad five times with M.C.C. to Bangladesh in 1978/79, East Africa in 1981/82, Derrick Robins XI to New Zealand in 1979/80 and Middlesex to Zimbabwe in 1980/81. He also played minor county championship cricket for Hertfordshire twice between 1976 to 1978 and 1983 to 1991. His last first-class match was for Minor Counties versus New Zealand at Lakenham, Norwich in 1986. He was a member of the Club’s General Committee until 2003.

Born at Tottenham, Middlesex in 1930, Alan Moss was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed tail end batsman. He represented Middlesex 307 times between 1950 and 1963 during which time, with the ball, he bagged 1,088 wickets (av. 19.81) with a best performance of 8 for 31 versus Northamptonshire at Kettering in 1960. A stubborn batsman he accumulated 1,234

runs (av. 6.56) with a top score of 40 and he held 121 catches. He took 100 wickets in a season five times with a best haul of 136 (av. 13.72) in 1960. Halfway through the 1962 season he took over the captaincy from Ian Bedford and he did an excellent job. He was a popular figure with his fellow players and was well respected as a captain and coming into a difficult job, did it well. He represented England in nine Tests between 1953/54 and 1960 taking 21 wickets (av. 29.80) with a best performance of 4 for 35 and he scored 61 runs (av. 10.16) with a top score of 26 and he held a single catch. On retirement at the age of 33 years, he ran a printing business and he has served as Chairman of the county club and is presently the President.

Born at Hampstead, London in 1913, Len Muncer was a right-handed aggressive middle order batsman and leg break and googly bowler, who changed to off breaks during the 1947 season and was a good slip fieldsman. He represented Middlesex 82 times between 1933 and 1946 before moving down to Wales. He played 224 games for Glamorgan between 1947 and 1957 and was a member of their 1948 championship winning team. During his career he amassed 8,646 runs (av. 20.88) with four hundreds and a top score of 135. He hit 1,000 runs in a season once in 1952 when he scored 1,097 (av. 24.37). He bagged 755 wickets (av. 20.90) with a best of 9 for 62 for Glamorgan versus Essex at Brentwood in 1948. He took 100 wickets in a season five times with a best of 159 (av. 17.27) in 1948. His last first-class match was for M.C.C. in 1957. After retiring from first-class cricket he became Head Coach at Lord's and ran a Sports Shop close to Lord's Cricket Ground. He died at Camden Town, London in 1982.

Born at North Kensington, London in 1935, wicket-keeper/batsman, John 'JT' Murray represented Middlesex from 1952 to 1975. Playing 635 first-class matches he scored 18,872 runs with a top score of 142, he took 6 wickets with his right-arm medium-pacers. He established a world record of 1,527 dismissals (1,270 catches and 257 stumpings) during his career, until surpassed by Bob Taylor in 1982/83. He achieved the record of scoring 1,000 runs and taking 100 dismissals in a season in 1957, the only player to do so since Les Ames in 1932. Making 21 Test appearances for England between 1961 and 1967 he scored 506 runs with a top score of 112 versus West Indies at the Oval in 1966 when he added 217 runs for the 8th wicket with Tom Graveney. He achieved 55 Test dismissals and he toured abroad eleven times. He holds the record for the most dismissals in a career by a Middlesex player 1,223 and for the most in a match 9 versus Hampshire at Lord's in 1965. In 1977-78 he acted as an England Test selector.

Born at Hounslow, Middlesex in 1879, Joe was a right-handed lower order batsman, left-arm bowler and wicket keeper. He made his first-class debut for Kent in 1899 and represented them in 27 matches until 1905. During the 1905 season he moved from Canterbury to Lord's and he represented Middlesex from 1905 until 1926 on 342 occasions. During his career he accumulated 6,663 runs (av. 14.29) with a top score of 96 n.o. and he held 565 catches and took 269 stumpings. A useful soccer player he appeared for Arsenal. He was Middlesex scorer between 1946 until he died at West Wickham, Kent in 1952.

Born at Auckland, New Zealand in 1971, Dion Nash was a right-arm fast medium bowler and a lower order right-handed batsman. After an impressive performance for New Zealand versus England at Lord's in the 2nd Cornhill Test of the 1994 series, when he scored 56 runs and took 6 for 76 and 5 for 93 (match figures of 11 for 169), the county signed him and he made his debut for Middlesex in 1995 and was capped in his first season. He promised much but suffered injury in his second season and despite trying hard to regain his fitness his contract was terminated at the end of the 1996 season. For Middlesex his best performances were with the bat 67 versus Essex at Chelmsford and with the ball 5 for 35 versus Hampshire at Lord's both in 1995. He represented Northern Districts twice between 1990/91-1991/92 and again since1995/96, Otago from 1992/93 to 1993/94 and he played 32 Tests for New Zealand between 1992/93 and his retirement in 2002. He took 93 wickets at 28.48 and scored 729 runs at 23.51 while in One-Day Internationals he took 64 wickets and hit 624 runs in his 81 matches. Nash is now an active spokesperson for the New Zealand Cricket Players' Association.

David Charles Nash was born in Chertsey, Surrey and educated at Malvern. He was a dependable right-handed late middle-order batsman and an underrated wicketkeeper, who is eighth in the all-time list for first-class dismissals with 314 (291 caught and 23 stumped).

He rose though the colts system and he made his limited-over debut at seventeen. He made his first-class debut in 1996 and was capped in 2000. He had a meteoric rise and represented the England under-19 and ‘A’ teams. He is a cheerful character who was at the heart of the team.

Born at Paddington, London in 1904, George Newman was a right-handed middle order batsman and right-arm medium pace bowler. He attended Eton before going on to Oxford University where he attained blues both years in 1926 and 1927. He represented Middlesex 50 times between 1929 and 1936 and he toured with M.C.C. to Canada in 1937. During his career he accumulated 2,742 runs (av. 25.86) with three centuries and a top score of 112. He bagged 17 wickets (av. 39.41) with a best of 3 for 48 and he held 27 catches. A noted athlete, he represented Oxford University in the high jump, the relay race, hurdles and squash achieving a blue in the latter. He was President of Middlesex between 1963 and 1976. He died at Braintree, Essex in 1982.

Born at Dublin, Ireland in 1861, Sir Timothy Carew O'Brien, brother of J.G. (Ireland) and brother-in-law of C.E. de Trafford (Warwickshire and Leicestershire) was an attractive middle order right-handed batsman and useful left-arm bowler. He attended Downside School, before going on to Oxford University. He attained blues both years in 1884 and 1885. He represented Middlesex in 156 matches between 1881 and 1898 scoring 7,377 runs (av. 29.63) with ten hundreds and with a top score of 202 versus Sussex at Hove in 1895. He also took 2 wickets (av. 136.00) and he held 111 catches and took 2 stumpings. He hit 1,000 runs in a season three times with a best of 1,150 (av. 27.38) in 1884. Playing five Tests for England, one as captain, between 1884 and 1895/96, he scored 59 runs (av. 7.37) with a highest score of 20 and he held 4 catches. He toured abroad twice; with Vernon to Australia in 1887/88 and Lord Hawke to South Africa in 1895/96. He also represented Ireland in first-class matches between 1902 and 1907. He became Sir Timothy after succeeding to the baronetcy on the death of his uncle Patrick. His last first-class match was for L. Robinson's XI when he scored 90 and 111 in 1914. He died at Ramsay, Isle of Man in 1948.

Born at Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa in 1909, Tuppy Owen-Smith was a useful right-handed middle order batsman, slow leg-break bowler and excellent outfielder. Representing his native Western Province between 1927/28 and 1949/50 and Oxford University where he attained blues all three years between 1931 and 1933, he represented Middlesex 28 times between 1935 and 1937. He scored 993 runs (av. 24.83) with a highest score of 77 and he took 100 wickets (av. 21.50) with a best performance of 6 for 68 for the county. During his career he played 101 matches accumulated 4,059 runs (av. 26.88) with three centuries with a top score of 168 n.o. bagged 319 wickets (av. 23.22) with a best of 7 for 153 and he held 93 catches. Playing five Tests for South Africa, he scored 252 runs (av. 42.00) with a top score of 129 and he held 4 catches. He toured abroad once, to England in 1929 when he scored 1,168 runs (av. 35.89) and he took 30 wickets (av. 25.80). A good all-round sportsman he was awarded blues for boxing and rugby whilst at Oxford and he went on to captain England at the former. He died at Rosebank, Cape Town, South Africa in 1990.

Born at Billingford in 1936; Peter Parfitt joined Middlesex in 1956 after representing his native Norfolk at minor county level. As a left-handed batsman, right-arm off-break bowler and fine fielder, he captained the county from 1968 to 1970 and he retired in 1972. Playing 498 first-class matches he scored 26,924 runs with 58 centuries and recorded a top score of 200 n.o. versus Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1964. He took 277 wickets with a best performance of 6 for 45 and he held 564 catches. He holds the county record for the most catches held in a season by a non wicket-keeper 46 in 1960 and 1966. Representing England in 37 Tests between 1961/62 and 1972, he toured abroad eight times, scored 1,882 runs with seven centuries including a top score of 131 n.o. versus New Zealand at Auckland in 1962/63. His best series was against Pakistan in 1962 when he amassed 340 runs with three centuries. Since retiring he has owned a pub and is now involved in corporate hospitality at major sporting events.

Ian Peebles was born at Aberdeen in 1908 where he was discovered at 13 years of age by George Geary, after which he came south to play for Chiswick Park C.C. in London. Making his first-class debut at 19 years for the Gentlemen versus Players at the Oval in 1927 his first wicket was Andy Sandham. He later represented Middlesex from 1928 to 1948, playing 251 first-class matches, he took 923 wickets with a best performance of 8 for 24 and he scored 2,313 runs. He played only one Varsity match for Oxford University in 1930 taking 13 for 237 and he also represented Scotland in 1937. Playing 13 Tests for England between 1927/28 and 1931 he toured abroad twice to South Africa. He took 45 Test wickets with a best performance of 6 for 63 versus South Africa at Johannesburg in 1930/31. Captaining Middlesex in 1939 his career ended tragically following damage to his eye in a wartime air raid. He subsequently entered the wine trade and later became the Cricket Correspondent of The Times and wrote several cricket books. He died at Speen, Buckinghamshire in 1980.

A sound right-handed middle order batsman and wicket keeper, Fred Price was born at Westminster, London in 1902. He represented Middlesex 382 times between 1926 and 1947. He accumulated 8,300 runs (av. 18.08) with three centuries, with a top score of 111 and he held 626 catches and took 301 stumpings behind the timbers. He hit 1,000 runs in a season once, 1,298 (av. 25.96) in 1934. He played one Test for England in 1938 against Australia when he scored just 6 runs and took 2 catches. He toured twice with M.C.C. to West Indies in 1929/30 and with Brinckman to Argentine in 1937/38. Between 1949 and 1967 he stood as a first-class umpire and he caused a sensation by no-balling Tony Lock for throwing. He umpired eight Tests between 1964 and 1967. He died at Hendon, Middlesex in 1969.

John Price was born in Harrow, Middlesex in 1937 and represented Wembley, before he made his county debut in 1961. He is a fondly remembered left-handed batsman and a right-arm fast bowler, with a memorable action. The strongly built Price took 734 wickets for the County at an average of 22.39 in 242 first-class matches. His personal best was 8/48 versus Derbyshire at Lord’s in 1966. In 124 List A limited-over matches, he took 192 wickets at an average of 18.65, with a personal best of 6/34. He represented England in 15 Tests between 1964 and 1972, taking 40 wickets at 35.02. He groomed Wayne Daniel for the 1st XI, before his retirement.

A reliable right-handed middle order batsman, leg break bowler and excellent close fieldsman, Clive Radley was born at Hertford in 1944. He made his county debut against Lancashire at Old Trafford, Manchester in 1964. He represented Middlesex in 520 matches between 1964 and 1987 amassing 24,147 runs (av. 35.45) with 42 hundreds and with a top score of 200 versus Northamptonshire at Uxbridge in 1985. He bagged 8 wickets (av. 19.50) with a best of 2 for 38 and he held 480 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season sixteen times with a best of 1,491 (av. 57.34) in 1980. He played eight Tests for England scoring 481 runs (av. 48.10) with a top score of 158 versus New Zealand at Auckland in 1977/78. He toured abroad five times with Derrick Robins to South Africa in 1972/73 and 1974/75, England to Pakistan and New Zealand in 1977/78, Australia in 1978/79 and Middlesex to Zimbabwe in 1980/81. He represented Norfolk in the minor county championship in 1961 and played one winter with Auckland in 1984/85. He shared a sixth wicket partnership of 277 with Fred Titmus versus the touring South Africans at Lord's. A prolific scorer in one day domestic matches he is particularly remembered for his 133 against Glamorgan in the John Player Sunday League in 1969. His 85 n.o. against Glamorgan in the Gillette Cup Final 1977, 89 n.o. against Essex in the Benson & Hedges Cup Final 1983 and his 67 against Kent in the NatWest Trophy Final 1984 epitomise his reliability for the Three Seaxes. Since retiring he has captained the 2nd XI and is now M.C.C. Head Coach at Lord's.

A right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed lower order batsman John Rawlin, father of E.R. (Yorkshire) was born at Greasborough, Rotherham, Yorkshire in 1856. He represented his native Yorkshire 27 times between 1880 and 1885 before moving south to represent Middlesex in 229 matches between 1889 and 1909. He bagged 659 wickets (av. 20.15) with a best haul of 8 for 29 versus Gloucestershire at Bristol in 1893. His best season was 1894 when he achieved 104 wickets (av. 14.53). He scored 5,680 runs (av. 17.57) with a single three figure score of 100 against arch rivals from south of the River Thames, Surrey at the Oval in 1901. He held 159 catches and despite not playing Test cricket for England, in 1887/88 he toured Australia with G.F. Vernon's XI. He died at his place of birth in 1924.

Mark Ramprakash is one of the finest batsmen Middlesex CCC has ever produced, and his record for the Club rightly places him alongside the likes of Patsy Hendron, Denis Compton, Mike Gatting and Desmond Haynes. Ramprakash’s career, contentiously, could be split in two. The contention being that he spent the second half of his career south of the River Thames with Surrey, Middlesex CCC’s greatest rivals. For Middlesex CCC the masterful and elegant right hander stuck 46 1st Class centuries, for Surrey 68.

Ramprakash was born in Bushey, Hertfordshire on 5 September 1969. He attended Gayton High School in Harrow – the same school as Angus Fraser – and represented Middlesex at every age group level, excelling all the way. It was therefore no surprise that he was contracted to the club before finishing his A levels and that he made his 1st XI debut at the age of just 17.

Ramprakash, who played club cricket for Bessborough CC and Stanmore CC, highlighted his potential nationally in 1988 when he scored an unbeaten fifty to guide Middlesex CCC to victory in a low scoring NatWest Trophy Final. He was awarded his county cap in 1990 and made his Test debut in 1991. Many believe, with the talent he possessed, he should have achieved more with England but he helped win silverware with Middlesex CCC, playing an important role in the Club winning two County Championships, a NatWest Trophy and the Sunday League title.

In total Ramprakash scored more than 22,500 runs for the Club, 15,046 of them coming in 1st Class cricket at an average of 50.48. In some ways his record in first-class cricket transcended his performances for England and he could be the last ever cricketer to score 100 first-class hundreds. His final tally of first-class hundreds – 114 – was, coincidentally, the same as Sir Vivian Richards, his childhood hero.

Ramprakash returned to Middlesex CCC in 2013 as the Club’s batting coach. He performed the role for two years before moving on to become England’s batting coach, a role he is fulfilling well.

Born at Stafford in 1906, Robert Walter Vivian Robins was an outstanding right-handed all-rounder. He first appeared for Middlesex in 1925 during his final term at Highgate School before going to Cambridge University where he achieved a blue in each of his three years between 1926 and 1928. A dynamic captain who made things happen he led Middlesex in three spells (1935 to 1938, 1946 to 1947 and 1950), winning the championship in 1947. In 379 first-class matches he scored 13,884 runs with 11 centuries and he recorded a top score of 140 versus Cambridge University at Fenner's in 1930. He took 969 wickets with a best performance of 8 for 69 versus Gloucestershire at Lord's in 1929 and he held 221 catches. Representing England in 19 Tests between 1929 and 1937 he captained his country 3 times in 1937 versus New Zealand and he achieved 612 runs with a top score of 108 versus South Africa at Old Trafford, Manchester in 1935 and he bagged 64 wickets. He later acted as a Test selector (1946 to 1949, 1954 and 1964). He attained a blue at soccer whilst at Cambridge University and represented Nottingham Forest. He died at Marylebone, London in 1968.

Robert Victor Charles Robins was born in Burnham in Buckinghamshire in 1935. He has followed in the footsteps of a distinguished father, the revered Walter. Like his father, he was a leg spinner and right-handed batsman. He arrived with a prodigious reputation from Eton.

He scored 712 runs and took 73 wickets in 44 first-class matches for the County. His best bowling performance was 7/78.

He successfully chaired the Cricket Committee for thirteen years during the Brearley and Gatting eras, before succeeding Mike Sturt as the County Chairman (1994-1996). He was elected President for a two year term in 2005.

Chris Rogers was signed by Middlesex CCC in 2011 to provide leadership and experience to the squad and during the four seasons he spent with the club he provided both. Rogers arrived with the pedigree of scoring county runs and he continued to do that with regularity. In the 60 1st Class matches he played for Middlesex CCC he passed 50 on 36 occasions. In all he struck 14 hundreds for Middlesex CCC. The most memorable being when he smashed an unbeaten 241 to see Middlesex to a remarkable victory over Yorkshire at Lord’s. The innings is rightly regarded as one of the best ever played by a Middlesex batsman.

Rogers was born on 31 August 1977 in Sydney, played his early cricket in Perth before moving to Melbourne, where he played most of his Sheffield Shield cricket. Prior to joining Middlesex CCC he had made one Test appearance for Australia but his performances for the Club encouraged Australia to pick him again. And he did not let them down, scoring five hundreds in 24 further appearances.

Rogers was not a pretty player to watch but he was highly effective and his resilience made him extremely popular with Middlesex members. He captained the Club in 2014 and in total scored just under 5,000 first-class runs for the club at an average of more than 50. He will rightly be regarded as one of Middlesex’s finest overseas players.

Michael Anthony Roseberry was born in Houghton-le-Spring in 1966. He was a dashing right-handed batsman who came to Lord’s with a tremendous reputation from Durham School.

He was a strong and powerful batsman, who was able to score heavily. He established a successful opening partnership with Desmond Haynes, before an ill-fated captaincy spell at Durham. He peaked in 1992, with 2,044 first-class runs at an average of 56.67, with nine hundreds.

He scored 10.010 runs at an average of 36.00, in 189 first-class matches during two spells with the County. He scored 20 centuries and took 135 catches. He returned in 1999 to finish his career with Middlesex and he continues to support the club from behind the scenes.

Born at Dumbarton in 1936, Eric Russell joined Middlesex in 1956 as a right-handed opening batsman and right-arm medium-pace bowler. Playing 448 first-class matches until his retirement in 1972 he accumulated 25,525 runs (av. 34.87) with 41 centuries, of which his top score was 193 versus Hampshire at Bournemouth in 1964. He took 22 wickets with a best performance of 3 for 20 and he held 304 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season thirteen times, going on to 2,000 runs in a season three times with a best season of 2,343 (av. 45.92) in 1964. Playing 10 Tests for England between 1961/62 and 1967 against six different Test nations he scored 362 runs with a top score of 70 versus South Africa at the Oval in 1965, he held 4 catches and he toured abroad on three occasions. After retiring he taught at Shiplake College and has in recent years he has been involved at M.C.C.'s Shenley Cricket Centre in Hertfordshire which was renamed the Denis Compton Ground in 1995. Eric was a member of the Club committee since 1996 until 2003 and is a life member of the Hertfordshire Cricket Society having served as Chairman from 1995 to 1998.

Born at Chiswick, Middlesex in 1948, Mike Selvey was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed lower order batsman. He represented Surrey in 6 matches between 1968 and 1971, before attaining a blue whilst at Cambridge University in 1971. He joined Middlesex in 1972 and played 213 matches for the county until 1982. He left Lord's after his Benefit in 1982, to take up the appointment as captain of Glamorgan between 1983 and 1984 when he was forced to retire after 39 matches due to injury. For the county he bagged 615 wickets (av. 25.45) with a best performance of 7 for 20 versus Gloucestershire at Gloucester in 1976, in 1978 he took 101 wickets (av. 19.09). He scored 1,835 runs (av. 12.48) with a top score of 67 versus Zimbabwe at Bulawayo in 1980/81 and he held 56 catches. He played three Tests for England between 1976 and 1976/77 taking 6 wickets (av. 57.16) with a best performance of 4 for 41 versus West Indies at Old Trafford, Manchester in 1976, 15 runs (av. 7.50) and a single catch. He is now a well-known sporting journalist with The Guardian Newspaper and broadcaster for BBC Radio Test Match Special.

Owais Alam Shah was born in Karachi, Pakistan in 1978 and raised in Middlesex from the age of nine. He came through the ranks of the esteemed Wycombe House Cricket Club, making a meteoric ascent into the County's 1st XI, debuting in limited-over cricket at sixteen.

A prodigiously gifted right-handed batsman who progressed through the England Under-19, 'A' and full limited-over teams. He made his Test debut in the Third Test at Mumbai in March 2006, scoring 88 in his first innings. The style has always been apparent, but he has began to come into his own now with a new found maturity. He scored 13.377 runs (at an average of 42.46) in 200 first-class matches for the County with 38 centuries and 159 catches. He joined Essex in 2011.

Born at Kentish Town, London in 1917, Harry Sharp was a sound right-handed opening batsman and off-break bowler. He represented the county in 162 matches between 1946 and 1955. He accumulated 6,422 runs (av. 26.10) with ten centuries and a highest innings of 165 n.o. versus Northamptonshire in 1951. He achieved 52 wickets (av. 32.11) with a best performance of 5 for 52 and he held 61 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season on three occasions, with a best of 1,564 (av. 32.58) in 1953. His last first-class match was for M.C.C. in 1957. He was Middlesex scorer during the period 1974 until 1993 when the introduction of computerised scoring evolved. He died close to his home in Enfield in 1995.

Born at Leyton, Essex in 1903, James Morton Sims was an attacking right-handed middle order batsman and leg break bowler. He represented Middlesex 381 times between 1929 and 1952 during which time he amassed 87,173 runs (av. 17.12) including three centuries with a top score of 121. He achieved 1,257 wickets (av. 25.23) with a best performance of 9 for 92 versus Lancashire at Old Trafford, Manchester in 1934 and he held 202 catches. He took 100 wickets in a season eight times with a best of 159 (av. 20.30) in 1939. He played four Tests for England between 1935 and 1936/37 taking 11 wickets (av. 43.63) with a best performance of 5 for 73 and he scored 16 runs (av. 4.00) and he held 4 catches. He toured abroad on three occasions with M.C.C. to Australia and New Zealand in 1935/36 and 1936/37 and Brinckman to South America 1937/38. His best bowling performance of all time was 10 for 90 for East versus West at Kingston-upon-Thames in 1948. His last first-class match was for M.C.C. in 1953. County Scorer from 1969 until his death in 1973. It is commonly believed that he succeeded Patsy Hendren in 1960, but he did not. Archie Fowler briefly acted in 1960, but Jim Alldis (the manager of the Cricket School) took this role from 1960 until 1968.

Born at Troumaca, St. Vincent, West Indies in 1954, Wilf Slack was a left-handed opening batsman and right-arm medium pace bowler. His family migrated from the Windward Islands to High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire when he was only 11 years old. Playing his early cricket for Buckinghamshire in the minor county championship in 1976. He represented Middlesex in 201 matches between 1977 and 1988 and accumulated 12,565 runs (av. 40.53) including 25 centuries with a top score of 248 n.o. versus Worcestershire at Lord's in 1981. He took 19 wickets at (av. 33.26) with a best performance of 3 for 17 and he held 137 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season eight times with a best of 1,900 (av. 54.28) in 1985. He played three Tests for England between 1985/86 and 1986 scoring 81 runs (av. 13.50) with a top score of 52 versus West Indies at St. Johns Antigua in 1985/86 and he held 3 catches. He toured abroad five times with Middlesex to Zimbabwe in 1980/81, Vic Lewis XI to Pakistan in 1981/82, England 'B' to Sri Lanka in 1985/86, England to West Indies in 1985/86 and to Australia in 1986/87. He played for his native Windward Islands between 1981/82 and 1982/83. On three occasions whilst batting for Middlesex he collapsed but no cause could be found for these blackouts. He had been batting in an exhibition match in The Gambia when he suddenly collapsed and died in 1989, the reason given being a heart attack. A sad loss for Middlesex cricket, a fitting tribute to his life is the 'Wilf Slack Memorial Cricket Ground' in Finchley, within half a mile of the Middlesex Indoor Cricket School and Sports centre.

Born at Corsham, Wiltshire in 1906, brother of W.A. (Minor Counties) 'Big Jim' Smith was a right-arm fast bowler and right-handed lower order batsman noted for his prowess as a six hitter. He represented Wiltshire in the minor county championship between 1926 and 1933 and he made his first-class debut for Minor Counties in 1930. He joined Middlesex in 1934 and represented the county 152 times until his retirement in 1939. He bagged 676 wickets (av. 17.75) with a best performance of 8 for 102, he scored 2,977 runs (av. 15.42) with a single century of 101 n.o. versus Kent at Canterbury in 1939 and he held 69 catches. He took 100 wickets in a season four times with a best of 172 (av. 18.88) in 1934. He played five Tests for England between 1934/35 and 1937 and toured once abroad to West Indies in 1934/35. He took 15 wickets (av. 26.20) with a best haul of 5 for 26, scored 102 runs (av. 10.20) with a top score of 27 and he held a single catch. Jim will be remembered for some remarkable hitting at Lord's. A shot through the committee room window; a huge hit over Father Time and a one handed hit on to the pavilion roof, over the Tavern and across the St. John's Wood Road into the adjacent synagogue off the bowling of Yorkshire's George Macauley. After the Second World War despite Middlesex wanting him to return to play matches, he played for East Lancashire and Blackburn Northern between 1945 and 1948. He died at Mellor near Blackburn, Lancashire in 1979.

Born at Enfield, Middlesex in 1942 and schooled at Enfield Grammar, Mike Smith was a sound right-handed opening batsman and slow left-arm bowler. He represented Middlesex 399 times between 1959 and 1980 whilst accumulating 18,575 runs (av. 31.64) with 37 centuries including a highest score of 181 versus Lancashire at Old Trafford, Manchester in 1967. He took 57 wickets (av. 32.73) with a best performance of 4 for 13 versus Gloucestershire at Lord's in 1961 and he held 210 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season eleven times with a best of 1,705 (av. 39.65) in 1970. He toured abroad four times with Derrick Robins XI to South Africa in 1972/73 and 1973/74, West Indies in 1974/75 and Sri Lanka in 1977/78. He played for England in One-Day Internationals against West Indies in 1976. In 1994 he took over from Harry Sharp as county scorer, a position he held until his death in 2004.

Born at Hampstead, London in 1901, Greville Stevens was a right-handed middle order batsman, leg break bowler and good close fieldsman. He attended University College School and Oxford University where he attained blues all four years between 1920 and 1923. He represented Middlesex 127 times between 1919 and 1932 during which time he accumulated 5,434 runs (av. 30.19) with seven centuries including a highest score of 170 n.o. he bagged 385 wickets (av. 27.42) with a best haul of 8 for 38 and he held 107 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season twice with a best of 1,434 (av. 33.34) in 1923. In 1919 whilst playing in a house match at score he hit 466 and immediately afterwards was selected to play for the Gentlemen versus Players at Lord's. He captained Oxford University in his last year 1923 but he could never spare the time to play for Middlesex regularly. He played ten Tests for England between 1922/23 and 1929/30 accumulating 263 runs (av. 15.47) and taking 20 wickets (av. 32.40) with a best of 5 for 90. He toured abroad four times with M.C.C. to South Africa in 1922/23 and 1927/28, West Indies 1929/30 and with Lord Tennyson's XI to Jamaica in 1931/32 His final first-class match was for M.C.C. and H.D.G. Leveson-Gower's XI in 1933. He died at Islington, London in 1970.

Born at Westoe, South Shields, Co. Durham, Andrew Stoddart joined Middlesex in 1885 from Hampstead C.C. where he had recorded 485 in 370 minutes, out of Hampstead's total of 813 versus Stoics. He played for the county until 1900 as a stylish right-handed batsman, right-arm medium-pace bowler and fine fieldsman. Playing 309 first-class matches, he scored 16,738 runs with 26 centuries recording a top score of 221 versus Somerset at Lord's in 1900, he took 278 wickets and he held 257 catches. Playing 16 Tests for England he amassed 996 runs with a top score of 173 versus Australia at Melbourne in 1894/95, which until 1974/75 was the highest score by an England captain in Australia. He captained and organised two of his four tours abroad and he was the first England captain to ask the opposition to bat in a Test Match. He was acknowledged as the best rugby three-quarter in England of his day and he captained his country several times in his ten internationals. He died at St. John's Wood, London in 1915 by his own hand.

The Johannesburg-born Andrew John Strauss was educated at Radley and Durham University. He is a commanding left-handed opening batsman who captained the County for two years following Angus Fraser’s retirement. He has an excellent technique and temperament, which has served him well, during his successful introduction to Test cricket.

On his Test debut, he became the second Englishman to score a Test century on debut at Lord’s and he came close to setting a new record with a century in the second innings. He scored a debut century in his first three Test series.

As one of the most successful England Test captains, he has led his country to Ashes triumphs in both England and Australia. He has won 21 of his 40 Tests in charge, drawing 13 and losing six.

He has scored 8.314 runs in 119 first-class matches for the County at an average of 42.63, with 19 centuries and has taken 86 catches. He scored his maiden double century versus Leicestershire at Lord's in 2011.

He was awarded the M.B.E. in 2005 and the OBE in 2011. He was also awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law by Durham University in 2011.

Michael Ormonde Cleasby Sturt was a highly capable wicketkeeper who was limited to thirty-three first-class matches, due to his highly successful City career. He deputised for John Murray on several occasions and he never let the team down. He made 72 dismissals (64 caught and 8 stumpings).

He was born in Wembley, Middlesex in 1941 and he has given distinguished service to the MCC and Middlesex Committees, as Chairman of the County Cricket and Selection sub-committees. He succeeded Mike Murray as the County Chairman for eight months in 1993.

Born at Forest Hill, London in 1907, Ernest William Swanton was a middle order right-handed batsman. He attended Cranleigh School, before representing Middlesex between 1937 and 1938 in 3 first-class matches. He scored 67 runs (av. 13.40) with a top score of 26 and he held a single catch.

He toured once as a player with Sir Julien Cahn's XI to America in 1933. In the 1950's he organised several tours of his own to the West Indies and organised his own team the Arabs C.C.

Without any doubt one of the best-known cricket journalist and commentator of his generation , he wrote for both the London Evening Standard, the Daily Telegraph and has written numerous cricket books. He died in 2000.

Born at Fitzroy, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia in 1880, the father of L.B. (Australians in India) and nephew of W.A. (Victoria), Frank Tarrant was a right-handed middle order batsman, left-arm slow medium bowler and an excellent slip fieldsman. He represented his native Victoria 13 times between 1898/99 to 1925/26 and he played 206 times for Middlesex between 1904 and 1914. For the county he accumulated 12,169 runs (av. 38.03) with 26 centuries including a highest score of 250 n.o. versus Essex at Leyton in 1914, he bagged 1,005 wickets (av. 17.43) with a best performance of 9 for 41 versus Gloucestershire at Bristol in 1907 and he held 193 catches. He hit 1,000 runs in a season nine times, going on to 2,000 once in 1911, when he hit 2,030 (av. 46.13). He exceeded 100 wickets in a season eight times with a best of 183 (av. 15.70) in 1907. Regarded as the best all-rounder of his time he achieved the coveted double eight times. He toured India with an Australian XI but never played Test cricket. He played matches for the Europeans between 1915/16 to 1936/37 and Patiala's XI between 1926/27 and 1933/34. In 1918/19 whilst playing for the Maharaja of Cooch Behar's XI at Poona in India he took 10 for 90 and hit 182 n.o. in the same match. He umpired a single Test in 1933/34 and died at Upper Hawthorn, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia in 1951.

Born Sydney, New South Wales, Australia in 1950, Jeff Thomson was a very fast right-arm quick bowler and right-handed late order batsman. Having been part of the most famous pace attack in Test cricket for much of the 1970's with pace partner Denis Lillee. Needing a replacement for the wonderful, Vintcent van der Bijl, who had proved a great success in 1980, the county turned to Jeff Thomson. 'Thommo' having represented New South Wales, Queensland and Australia in 34 Tests arrived at Lord's on the back of Middlesex's 1980 double winning year. Early in the 1981 season the county took the field at Lord's for the first time with a team of eleven full international Test players. Playing only 8 times for Middlesex in 1981 due to injury, he took 23 wickets (av. 22.69), he scored 63 runs (av. 12.60) and he held 4 catches. His best performances of 4 for 66 and a top score of 35 came in the same match versus Essex at Lord's. His best performance during a disappointing season was 7 for 22 against Hampshire in the zonal group match of the Benson & Hedges Cup at Lord's.

Born in Somerstown in 1932, a talented all-rounder, Fred Titmus made his Middlesex debut at 16 years in 1949 as a right-arm off-spin bowler and capable right-handed batsman. His career spanned five decades until 1982, during which time he played 792 first-class matches, scoring 21,558 runs, he took 2,830 wickets and he held 473 catches. He achieved the double on eight occasions and he bagged 100 wickets in a season sixteen times with a best of 191 wickets in 1955. His career best performances were 137 n.o. versus South Australia at Adelaide in 1962/63 and 9 for 52 versus Cambridge University at Fenner's in 1962. Playing 53 Tests for England between 1955 and 1974/75 he toured abroad nine times scoring 1,449 runs with a best of 84 n.o. versus India at Bombay in 1963/64 and he took 153 wickets with a best performance of 7 for 79 versus Australia at Sydney in 1962/63. He represented Orange Free State in 1975/76. During his tenure as Surrey Coach (1977-1978), he appeared once for Surrey in 1978. A Test selector from 1986 to 1988 he ran a sub Post-Office in Potten End, near Hemel Hempstead in Hertfordshire for many years.

He died in March 2011 aged 78.

Born at Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey in 1957, Keith Tomlins was a right-handed middle order batsman and right-arm medium pace bowler. He represented Middlesex between 1977 and 1985 in 84 matches before moving to Gloucestershire for whom he played 24 matches between 1986 and 1987. During his career he accumulated 3,880 runs (av. 27.13) with five centuries including a top score of 146 for Middlesex versus Oxford University at the Parks in 1982. He took just 4 wickets (Av. 90.00) with a best of 2 for 28 for Middlesex versus Kent at Lord's in 1982 and he held 66 catches. He toured abroad twice with Middlesex to Zimbabwe in 1980/81 and with Gloucestershire to Sri Lanka in 1986/87. He was in 1998 named as the ECB cricket coach for the western region.

Born at Melbourne in 1873, a class all-rounder, Albert Trott represented his native Victoria and Australia before joining Middlesex having been excluded from the Australian touring party. He scored 72 and took 8 for 43 in his first Test versus England at Adelaide and he qualified to play for the county between 1898 and 1910. Playing 375 first-class matches, he scored 10,696 runs, achieved 1,674 wickets and he held 452 catches. Playing for M.C.C. versus the touring Australians at Lord's in 1899 he hit a ball bowled by Monty Noble clean over the roof of the members' pavilion. In 1899 and 1900 he achieved the double of 1,000 runs and 200 wickets in a season. He also represented London County C.C. from 1900 to 1904 and Hawke's Bay in New Zealand in 1901/02. He played a total of 5 Tests, 3 for Australia in 1894/95 versus England and 2 for England in 1898/99 versus South Africa scoring a total of 228 runs and taking 26 wickets. He later acted as an umpire from 1911 to 1913 and after suffering from dropsy in 1914 he took his own life at his lodgings in Willesden Green, North West London.

Phil Tufnell was born at Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire in 1966 and attended schools in Highgate and Southgate before making his Middlesex debut in 1986 versus Lancashire at Old Trafford, Manchester. A slow left-arm spinner and right-handed tail end batsman, he soon established himself as an ideal replacement 'spin twin' for John Emburey after the retirement of Phil Edmonds in 1987. He has taken over 1000 first-class wickets, with a best return of 8 for 29 versus Glamorgan at Cardiff in 1993 and in Tests of 7 for 47 versus New Zealand at Christchurch in 1992/93. He has scored over 2000 runs with a top score of 67*versus Worcestershire in 1996. He was awarded his county cap in 1990 and to-date his best season came in 1991 when he took 88 wickets. He has represented England in 20 Tests since making his debut versus Australia at Brisbane in 1990/91 and he took 121 wickets. He celebrated his benefit season with the club in 1999 and although being called back for the odd Test by England managed to achieve his 1,000th wicket for Middlesex during the 2001 season. He retired from first class cricket in April 2003 and has gone on to a successful television career.

Middlesex CCC provided Shaun Udal with a sort of Indian Summer to his career after John Emburey, the then Director of Cricket, plucked him out of minor counties cricket to play for the club. Udal, born on 18 March 1969, was 38 at the time and he provided Middlesex with three years of good service before finally retiring in 2010.

The bulk of Udal’s 1,330 professional wickets and 11,279 professional runs were accumulated for Hampshire CCC but in 2008 he captained Middlesex CCC to the Club’s first domestic trophy, the T20 Cup, in 15 years. His guile and experience allowed him to take 163 wickets for the Club at an average of approximately 32.

Born at Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa in 1948, the grandson of V.A. (Western Province), son of P.G.V. (South Africa) and great nephew of V.A.W. (Western Province), Vintcent van der Bijl was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed lower order batsman. Making his first-class debut for the South African Universities in 1967/68, he represented Natal between 1968/69 and 1981/82 and Transvaal in 1982/83 in the Currie Cup. He represented Middlesex in 1980-1981 21 times and helped the county to the double of the county championship and the Gillette Cup in 1980. For the county he bagged 86 wickets (av. 15.00) with a best performance of 6 for 47 versus Sussex at Hove in 1980 and he scored 331 runs (av. 25.46) with a top score of 76 versus Nottinghamshire at Lord's in 1980 and he held 5 catches. He topped the bowling averages for the 1980 season with 85 wickets (av. 14.72) and took 5 wickets in an innings on five occasions during the season and took match figures of 10 for 69 versus Derbyshire at Uxbridge in 1980 when Middlesex won by 10 wickets. He toured abroad twice with Wilfred Isaacs's XI to England in 1969 and South Africa to Australia in 1971/72, which was cancelled.

Born at Swartwater, Queenstown, Cape Province, South Africa in 1876, Albert Vogler was a leg break googly bowler and right-handed middle order batsman. He represented Middlesex in a single match versus Cambridge University at Fenner's in 1906 whilst a member of the Lord's groundstaff, with the intention of qualifying to represent the county but he returned to South Africa. He scored 87 runs (av. 43.50) with a top score of 52 and he took 5 wickets (av. 18.20) with a best bowling performance of 4 for 71. He played the rest of his first-class cricket for Natal in 1903/04, Transvaal between 1904/05 and 1909/10 and Western Province between 1905/06 and 1906/07. He played fifteen Tests for South Africa between 1905/06 and 1910/11 and toured abroad twice to England in 1907 and Australia in 1910/11. He scored 340 runs (av. 17.00) with a top score of 65 and he bagged 64 wickets (av. 22.73) with a best haul of 7 for 94. His best bowling performance was 10 for 26 for Eastern Province versus Griqualand West at Johannesburg in 1906/07. His final first-class match was in South Africa for L.J. Tancred's XI in 1911/12. He died at Fort Napier, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa in 1946.

Born at Southgate, Middlesex in 1837, Vyell Edward Walker was a right-handed middle order batsman, accumulating 1,310 runs (av. 17.70) with a top score of 87 n.o. As a right-hand slow under-arm bowler, he took 120+10 wickets (av. 15.12) with a best performance of 10 for 104 versus Lancashire at Old Trafford, Manchester in 1865 and was an excellent fieldsman. He attended Harrow School before represented Middlesex in 52 matches between 1859 and 1877 and he also played one season of minor county cricket with Bedfordshire in 1863. In 1860 he was the best all-round amateur cricketer in England and in 1859 at the Oval scored 108 and took 14 for 91 for England versus Surrey. He captained the county from 1864 to 1872 and was President of M.C.C. in 1891. He had been Middlesex Treasurer from 1897 and President from 1898 having previously been President in 1869 until his death in 1906 at Arnos Grove, Middlesex.

Born at Southgate, Middlesex in 1844, Isaac Walker was a right-handed stylish middle-order batsman, right-hand fast, later slow, under-arm bowler and excellent deep fieldsman. He attended Harrow School prior to joining Middlesex in 1862 and he represented the county 144 times until his retirement in 1884. He accumulated 6,064 runs (av. 25.48) including four centuries with a top score of 145 and he took 152 wickets (av. 20.73) with a best performance of 6 for 42 and he held 138 catches. His best season was 1868 when he scored 661 runs (av. 34.78). He captained the county from 1873 to 1884 and continued as a committee member until his death. He had been associated with the county club since its foundation in 1864, and in fact scored 102 on his county debut versus Surrey Club at the Oval in 1862. He died at Regent's Park, London in 1898.

Born at Southgate, Middlesex in 1842, Russell Walker, brother of Alfred (Middlesex), A.H. (Middlesex), Frederic (Middlesex), John (Middlesex), Isaac D. (Middlesex) and Edward (Middlesex), nephew of Henry (M.C.C. 1832) was a right-handed attacking opening batsman, right-hand slow round-arm bowler and good fieldsman. He attended Harrow School and then went on to Oxford University where he attained blues all five years between 1861 and 1865.

He represented Middlesex 45 times between 1862 and 1877 during which time he amassed 1,678 runs (av. 22.07) with a single century of which his highest score was 104 and he bagged 142 wickets (av. 17.54) with a best performance of 6 for 76. His best season was 1865 when he recorded 770 runs (av. 24.83) and his last first-class match was for M.C.C. in 1878.

He was a committee member of both M.C.C. and Middlesex until his death, having served as President of Middlesex from 1906 to 1922 and as a Trustee of M.C.C. He represented Oxford University at rackets being a notable player. He died at Regent's Park, London in 1922.

Born in Trinidad in 1873, 'Plum' Warner captained Rugby School before making his first-class debut for Oxford University in 1894, where he gained a blue in 1895 and 1896. A right-handed batsman, he played for Middlesex from 1894 to 1920 and he acted as captain from 1908 to 1920. Playing 519 first-class matches, he scored 29,028 runs with 60 centuries and recorded a top score of 244 for the Rest of England versus Warwickshire at the Oval in 1911. For England he played 15 Tests from 1898/99 to 1912 and he scored 622 runs with a best of 132 n.o. versus South Africa at Johannesburg in 1898/99. Few cricketers have dedicated so much of their life to the game as 'Plum' in his capacity as player, manager, Test selector, writer and founder of The Cricketer magazine in 1921. He was knighted for his services to cricket in 1937. He acted as deputy secretary of M.C.C. during the Second World War and became President in 1950/51 and he had a stand named after him at Lord's in 1958. He died at West Lavington, Sussex in 1953 and his ashes were scattered at Lord's near the spot where he hit his first four.

Born at Ealing, Middlesex in 1927, John 'JJ' Warr was a right-arm fast medium bowler and right-handed tail end batsman. He attained blues all four years between 1949 and 1952 whilst at Cambridge University and he captained the side in 1951. 'JJ' represented Middlesex 260 times between 1949 and 1960 taking 703 wickets (av. 20.76) with a best performance of 9 for 65 against Kent at Lord's in 1956. He scored 2,744 runs (av. 10.80) with a highest score of 51 and he held 91 catches. Captaining the county between 1958 and 1960, he exceeded 100 wickets in a season twice with a best of 116 (av. 18.17) in 1956. He played two Tests for England with a best of 1 for 76, his only wicket being that of Australian Ian Johnson, caught by Godfrey Evans behind the wicket. He toured abroad five times with M.C.C. to Australia and New Zealand in 1950/51, Canada in 1951, East Africa in 1957/58, E.W. Swanton's XI to West Indies in 1955/56 and with the Duke of Norfolk's XI to Jamaica in 1956/57. In 1991 he was elected a Trustee of M.C.C. and in 1987/88 he served as President of the club. Retiring from first-class cricket in 1960, he concentrated on a career in the City and is a member of the Jockey Club, is a senior steward at Goodwood and a highly respected and fun after-dinner speaker.

Born at Bethnal Green, London in 1855, brother of H.R. (Middlesex) and G.A. (M.C.C.), Alexander Webbe was a stylish right-handed opening batsman, right-arm fast medium bowler, specialist mid-wicket fieldsman and occasional wicket keeper. Schooled at Harrow, he went on to Oxford University attaining blues all four years between 1875 and 1878 and captained the side in 1877 and 1878. He represented the county 247 times between 1875 and 1900. During his career he scored 14,465 runs (av. 24.81) with 14 centuries including a top score of 243 n.o. versus Yorkshire at Huddersfield in 1897. He bagged 109 wickets (av. 25.21) with a best haul of 5 for 23 and he held 228 catches and took 10 stumpings. His best season was 1887 when he recorded 1,244 runs (av. 47.84). He captained Middlesex between 1885 and 1898, being joint leader with Andrew Stoddart in 1898. He acted as Middlesex Secretary between 1900 and 1922 and was club President during the period 1923 to 1936. A useful rackets and footballer he represented Oxford University in both sports. He died at Fulvens, Hoe, Abinger Hammer, Surrey in 1941.

Paul Nicholas Weekes was a dashing left-handed batsman who batted throughout the top eight of the batting order and was a capable off-break bowler. He was born in Hackney in 1969 and made his first-class debut in 1990. He was awarded his county cap in 1993 and a benefit 2002. He played for the England ‘A’ team and was unlucky not to receive further honours.

In first-class cricket, he played in 233 matches for Middlesex, scoring 10,946 runs at an average of 35.19, with 20 hundreds and 55 fifties. His highest score was 171* versus Somerset at Uxbridge in 1996. He also took 210 catches and 302 wickets with his off-spin at an average of 41.81. His best bowling performance was 8/39.

In 319 List A limited-over matches, he has scored 7,586 runs at an average of 30.96, with 9 hundreds and 46 fifties. He took 137 catches and 320 wickets at an average of 29.67, with a personal best of 4/17.

In 23 ListA Twenty20 matches, he scored 516 runs at an average of 30.35 and took 10 wickets at 52.70with five catches.

Following his retirement, he was appointed director of cricket at Hampstead C.C.

Born at St. Pancras, London in 1871, brother of L.S. (Middlesex) and Clifford (Cambridge University), Cyril Wells was an attractive right-handed middle order batsman, off and leg break bowler and fine slip fieldsman. Schooled at Dulwich, he attained blues all three years between 1891 and 1893 whilst at Cambridge University. He played four matches for Surrey between 1892 and 1893 before moving to Lord's in 1895. He represented Middlesex 113 times between 1895 and 1909. During his career he accumulated 4,229 runs (av. 22.02) with four centuries including a top score of 244 for Middlesex versus Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge, Nottingham in 1899. He bagged 465 wickets (av. 19.86) with a best performance of 8 for 35 and he held 122 catches. A well respected rugby footballer he represented Cambridge University, Harlequins, Middlesex and England. He died at St. John's Wood, London in 1963.

Born at Fulham, London in 1936; Bob 'Knocker' White was a sound left-handed opening or middle order batsman and off break bowler. He represented Middlesex 114 times between 1958 and 1965 before moving to Trent Bridge in 1966. He made 298 appearances for Nottinghamshire between 1966 and 1980. His best season with the bat was 1963 when he recorded 1,355 runs (av. 33.87) and his best season with the ball was 1971 when he took 81 wickets (av. 26.21). During his career he amassed 12,452 runs (av. 23.18) with 5 centuries of which his highest score was 116 n.o. for Nottinghamshire versus Surrey at the Oval in 1967. He took 693 wickets (av. 30.50) with a best haul of 7 for 41 for Nottinghamshire versus Derbyshire at Ilkeston in 1971 and he held 190 catches. His career was quite remarkable in that he did not take any wickets whatsoever during his eight seasons whilst with Middlesex. In 1983 he was elected to the first-class umpires list.

Neil Fitzgerald Williams (nicknamed ‘Nelly’) was born at Hopewell, St Vincent in the West Indies on 2nd July 1962 and emigrated to England with his family, when he was thirteen.

He represented Hornsey C.C. and the MCC Young Professionals as a young colt, before making his name as a right-arm fast-medium bowler and a useful right-handed batsman for Middlesex (1982-1994). He was awarded his county cap in 1984 and represented the county in 193 first-class matches, taking 479 wickets with a personal best of 8/75 (with match figures of 12/139) versus Gloucestershire at Lord’s in 1992. His highest score was 77 versus Warwickshire at Edgbaston in 1991. He played for England in one Test versus India at the Oval in 1990.

He wintered abroad with the Windward Islands (1982/1983-1991/1992), Tasmania (1983/1984) in the Sheffield Shield and with the English Counties XI in 1984/1985. He was awarded a richly deserved benefit in 1994, before finishing his career with Essex (1995-1998).

He died suddenly on 27th March 2006 from pneumonia, following a stroke in St Vincent. His premature death aged 43 was greatly mourned.

Born at Paddington, London in 1912, Jack Young was a slow left-arm bowler, right-handed lower order batsman and a fine gully fieldsman. Representing Middlesex 292 times between 1933 and 1956, he bagged 1,182 wickets (av. 19.21) with a best performance of 9 for 52 versus Gloucestershire at Cheltenham in 1947. He scored 2,124 runs (av. 8.56) with a top score of 62 versus Yorkshire in 1949 and he held 125 catches. He took 100 wickets in a season eight times with a best of 163 (av. 19.88) in 1952. He played eight Tests for England between 1947 and 1949 and he toured once with M.C.C. to South Africa in 1948/49. He took 17 wickets (av. 44.52) with a best haul of 3 for 65 versus, scored 28 runs (av. 5.60) and he held 5 catches. His best bowling performance in first-class cricket was 9 for 55 for an England XI versus a Commonwealth XI at Hastings in 1951. He died in London in 1993.

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